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ACI Utility Manual

© 2006 by ACI Worldwide Inc. All rights reserved. All information contained in this documentation is confidential and proprietary to ACI Worldwide Inc., and has been delivered for use pursuant to license. No part of this documentation may be photocopied, electronically transferred, modified, or reproduced in any manner that is contrary to license without the prior written consent of ACI Worldwide Inc. Access Control Server, ACI Automated Case Management System, ACI Card Management System, ACI Claims Manager, ACI Commerce Gateway, ACI Debit Card System, ACI e-Courier, ACI Host Link, ACI Merchant Accounting System, ACI Payments Manager, ACI Proactive Risk Manager, ACI Smart Chip Manager, BASE24, BASE24-atm, BASE24-card, BASE24-check auth, BASE24 configuration manager, BASE24-es, BASE24-frequent shopper, BASE24-infobase, BASE24-pos, BASE24-refunds, BASE24-remote banking, BASE24-teller, NET24, and WINPAY24 are trademarks or registered trademarks of ACI Worldwide Inc., Transaction Systems Architects, Inc., or their subsidiaries. Other companies’ trademarks, service marks, or registered trademarks and service marks are trademarks, service marks, or registered trademarks and service marks of their respective companies.

Version Record Nov-2006, Version 10.1

Table Of Contents Section 1 ................................................................................................................ 1-1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 1-1 ACI Utilities Overview ....................................................................................... 1-1 Utility Procs – File Description.......................................................................... 1-2 Procedures for Using Utilities ........................................................................... 1-3 Syntax Conventions ......................................................................................... 1-5 Section 2 ................................................................................................................ 2-1 Arithmetic Overflow Prevention ....................................................................... 2-1 ADD^DOUBLE.............................................................................................. 2-1 ADD^DOUBLEX (extended address version) ............................................... 2-2 ADD^FIXED .................................................................................................. 2-3 ADD^FIXEDX (extended address version) ................................................... 2-4 ADD^INT....................................................................................................... 2-5 ADD^INTX (extended address version) ........................................................ 2-6 MULT^DOUBLE............................................................................................ 2-7 MULT^DOUBLEX (extended address version) ............................................. 2-8 MULT^FIXED................................................................................................ 2-9 MULT^FIXEDX (extended address version) ............................................... 2-10 MULT^INT................................................................................................... 2-11 MULT^INTX (extended address version) .................................................... 2-12 Section 3 ................................................................................................................ 3-1 Bit Manipulation ................................................................................................. 3-1 CLEARBIT .................................................................................................... 3-1 CLEAR^BITX (extended address version).................................................... 3-2 SETBIT ......................................................................................................... 3-3 SET^BITX (extended address version)......................................................... 3-4 TESTBIT ....................................................................................................... 3-5 TEST^BITX (extended address version)....................................................... 3-6 Section 4 ................................................................................................................ 4-1 Circular Linked List Procs ................................................................................ 4-1 Overview....................................................................................................... 4-1 CL^DELETE.................................................................................................. 4-2 CL^INSERT .................................................................................................. 4-3 Section 5 ................................................................................................................ 5-1 COBOL Processing............................................................................................ 5-1 COBOL^ALTERPRIORITY ........................................................................... 5-1 COBOL^CREATE ......................................................................................... 5-2 COBOL^DELAY............................................................................................ 5-4 COBOL^GETCRTPID................................................................................... 5-5 Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

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Table Of Contents COBOL^GETFILENUM................................................................................. 5-6 COBOL^LOOKUPPPD ................................................................................. 5-7 COBOL^PURGE ........................................................................................... 5-8 COBOL^RENAME ........................................................................................ 5-9 Section 6................................................................................................................. 6-1 Date and Time Conversions.............................................................................. 6-1 ASCII^JULIAN^TIMESTAMP ........................................................................ 6-1 ASCII^TIMESTAMP ...................................................................................... 6-2 BUMP^DAY .................................................................................................. 6-3 BUMP^YYMMDD .......................................................................................... 6-4 CLOCK^TIME ............................................................................................... 6-5 COMPARE^ASCII^YYMMDD ....................................................................... 6-6 COMPARE^BINARY^YYMMDD ................................................................... 6-8 CONTIMESTAMP ....................................................................................... 6-10 CONVERT^JULIAN^TO^GREG.................................................................. 6-11 CONVERT^TIME^TO^YYMMDD ................................................................ 6-12 CONVERT^TIMESTAMP^FORMAT ........................................................... 6-13 CONVERT^YYMMDD^TO^TIME ................................................................ 6-14 CURRENT^TIME^AS^STRING................................................................... 6-15 DAY^OF^WEEK.......................................................................................... 6-16 GET^DAY^OF^WEEK................................................................................. 6-17 GET^NEXT^DAY ........................................................................................ 6-18 JULIAN ....................................................................................................... 6-19 JULIAN^DATE ............................................................................................ 6-20 JULIAN^TIMESTAMP^ASCII ...................................................................... 6-21 JULIAN^TO^YYMMDD ............................................................................... 6-22 LEAP^YEAR ............................................................................................... 6-23 LONG^DATE^AND^TIME ........................................................................... 6-24 TEST^HOLIDAY ......................................................................................... 6-25 TEST^WEEKEND ....................................................................................... 6-26 TIMESTAMP^ADJUST^NUM^MINUTES.................................................... 6-27 TIMESTAMP^ADJUST^NUM^MINUTES^DBL ........................................... 6-28 TIMESTAMP^ASCII .................................................................................... 6-29 TIME^ASCII ................................................................................................ 6-30 TIME^TIMESTAMP..................................................................................... 6-32 TIME^ZONE^CHANGE............................................................................... 6-33 TIME^ZONE^CHANGEX (extended address version) ............................... 6-35 TODAYS^DATE .......................................................................................... 6-37 VALID^DAT^TIM^STRING.......................................................................... 6-38 VALID^DATE^YYMMDD............................................................................. 6-40 VALID^TIM^STRING .................................................................................. 6-41 YYMMDD^TO^JULIAN ............................................................................... 6-43 YY^DDD^TO^TIME..................................................................................... 6-44

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Table Of Contents Section 7 ................................................................................................................ 7-1 Debugging Procs ............................................................................................... 7-1 HEX^DUMP .................................................................................................. 7-1 PEP^OFFSET............................................................................................... 7-2 TRACER ....................................................................................................... 7-3 TRACER printout example:........................................................................... 7-5 TRACK.......................................................................................................... 7-6 Section 8 ................................................................................................................ 8-1 Encryption/Decryption Procs............................................................................ 8-1 DECODE ...................................................................................................... 8-1 DECODEX (extended address version)........................................................ 8-3 DECRYPT..................................................................................................... 8-5 DECRYPT^PIN ............................................................................................. 8-6 DECRYPT^PIN^1 ......................................................................................... 8-7 ENCODE ...................................................................................................... 8-8 ENCODEX (extended address version)...................................................... 8-10 ENCRYPT................................................................................................... 8-12 PROCESS^DES^PIN.................................................................................. 8-13 Section 9 ................................................................................................................ 9-1 Format Conversion Procs ................................................................................. 9-1 ALL^ASCII^DOUBLE .................................................................................... 9-1 ALL^ASCII^FIXED ........................................................................................ 9-2 ALL^ASCII^INTEGER................................................................................... 9-3 ALL^HEX ...................................................................................................... 9-4 ALL^NUMERIC ............................................................................................. 9-5 ALL^NUMERICX (extended address version) ............................................. 9-6 ASCII^DOUBLE ............................................................................................ 9-7 ASCII^DOUBLEX (extended address version) ............................................ 9-8 ASCII^FIXED ................................................................................................ 9-9 ASCII^FIXEDX (extended address version) ............................................... 9-10 ASCII^INTEGER......................................................................................... 9-11 ASCII^INTEGERX (extended address version) .......................................... 9-12 ASCII^TO^D2230 ....................................................................................... 9-13 ASCII^TO^EBCDIC..................................................................................... 9-14 ASCII^TO^EBCDICX (extended address version) ...................................... 9-15 ASTERISK^FILL ......................................................................................... 9-16 BASE64^DECODE ..................................................................................... 9-17 BASE64^ENCODE ..................................................................................... 9-18 BASE94^DECODE ..................................................................................... 9-19 BASE94^ENCODE ..................................................................................... 9-20 BINARY^HEXCHAR ................................................................................... 9-21 BINARY^HEXCHARX (extended address version)..................................... 9-22 CRNCY^DECIMAL^PLACES...................................................................... 9-23 GET^CNTRY^DATA................................................................................ 9-24 GET^CRNCY^CDE^ALPHA.................................................................... 9-25 CRNCY^DECIMAL^PLACES^ALPHA..................................................... 9-26 Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

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Table Of Contents DOLLAR^SUPPRESS ................................................................................ 9-27 DOUBLE^ASCII .......................................................................................... 9-28 DOUBLE^ASCIIX (extended address version) ........................................... 9-29 DOUBLE^DOLLAR ..................................................................................... 9-30 DOUBLE^DOLLAR^ASTERISK.................................................................. 9-32 EBCDIC^TO^ASCII..................................................................................... 9-34 EBCDIC^TO^ASCIIX (extended address version) ...................................... 9-35 FIXED^ASCII .............................................................................................. 9-36 FIXED^ASCIIX (extended address version)................................................ 9-37 FIXED^DOLLAR ......................................................................................... 9-38 FIXED^DOLLAR^ASTERISK ...................................................................... 9-39 FNUMIN ...................................................................................................... 9-40 FNUMOUT .................................................................................................. 9-41 FORMATTED^FNUMOUT .......................................................................... 9-43 GRAPHIC^HEX........................................................................................... 9-45 HEXCHAR^BINARY ................................................................................... 9-46 HEXCHAR^BINARYX (extended address version)..................................... 9-48 HEXCHAR^INTEGER................................................................................. 9-50 INTEGER^ASCII ......................................................................................... 9-51 INTEGER^ASCIIX (extended address version) .......................................... 9-52 INTEGER^HEXCHAR................................................................................. 9-53 SET^PARITY .............................................................................................. 9-54 TRANSLATE............................................................................................... 9-55 TRANSLATEX (extended address version) ................................................ 9-56 ZDNUMIN ................................................................................................... 9-57 ZDNUMOUT ............................................................................................... 9-58 ZNUMOUT .................................................................................................. 9-59 Section 10............................................................................................................. 10-1 Manipulation..................................................................................................... 10-1 String Manipulation......................................................................................... 10-1 CONVERT^FIELD^JUSTIFICATION .......................................................... 10-1 CONVERT^STATE^CODE ......................................................................... 10-2 DELETE^EXTRA^BLANKS......................................................................... 10-3 FIELD^FINDER........................................................................................... 10-4 FIND^STRING ............................................................................................ 10-6 FORMAT^DECIMAL ................................................................................... 10-8 LEFT^JUSTIFY ......................................................................................... 10-10 MOD10^ADD ............................................................................................ 10-11 MOD10^ADDX (extended address version).............................................. 10-12 MOD10^SUBTRACT................................................................................. 10-13 MOD10^SUBTRACTX (extended address version) .................................. 10-14 PACK ........................................................................................................ 10-15 REMOVE^BLANKS................................................................................... 10-17 REMOVE^NON^NUMERIC ...................................................................... 10-18 RIGHT^JUSTIFY....................................................................................... 10-19 STRLEN.................................................................................................... 10-20 vi

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Table Of Contents STRLENX (extended address version) .................................................... 10-21 SYM^NAME^LEN ..................................................................................... 10-22 UNPACK................................................................................................... 10-23 VALID^DECIMAL^NUMBER..................................................................... 10-25 ZERO^SUPPRESS................................................................................... 10-26 Data Manipulation ........................................................................................ 10-27 DEFINEs................................................................................................... 10-28 UPSHIFT^FIELD....................................................................................... 10-30 Section 11............................................................................................................. 11-1 Timer Routines................................................................................................. 11-1 Overview..................................................................................................... 11-1 User Data Segment Timer Routines ........................................................... 11-2 DELETE^THIS^TIMER ............................................................................... 11-5 FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMER ............................................................................ 11-6 NEXT^EXPIRE^TIME ................................................................................. 11-7 TIMER^DELETE ......................................................................................... 11-8 TIMER^DELETE^1 ..................................................................................... 11-9 TIMER^EXPIRED ..................................................................................... 11-11 TIMER^INIT .............................................................................................. 11-12 TIMER^INSERT........................................................................................ 11-13 Extended Memory Segment Timer Routines ............................................ 11-14 DELETE^THIS^TIMERX........................................................................... 11-17 FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMERX ........................................................................ 11-18 NEXT^EXPIRE^TIMEX............................................................................. 11-19 TIMER^ALLOCATEX................................................................................ 11-20 TIMER^DELETEX..................................................................................... 11-21 TIMER^EXPIREDX................................................................................... 11-23 TIMER^INITX............................................................................................ 11-24 TIMER^INSERTX ..................................................................................... 11-26 Section 12............................................................................................................. 12-1 Miscellaneous Procs ....................................................................................... 12-1 BINARY^SEARCH...................................................................................... 12-1 CIRC^LEFT^SHIFT..................................................................................... 12-3 CIRC^RIGHT^SHIFT .................................................................................. 12-4 COMPLEMENT .......................................................................................... 12-5 CONVERT^REC^ADDR^TO^REF^NO....................................................... 12-6 CONVERT^REF^NO^TO^REC^ADDR....................................................... 12-7 CURRENT^ADDR ...................................................................................... 12-8 DBL^OCTAL^WIDTH.................................................................................. 12-9 DBL^WIDTH ............................................................................................. 12-10 EDITLINENO ............................................................................................ 12-11 FUNCTION^KEY ...................................................................................... 12-12 GET^NEXT^ARG...................................................................................... 12-13 MOTHER .................................................................................................. 12-15 MSG^AGE ................................................................................................ 12-16 OCTAL^WIDTH ........................................................................................ 12-17 Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

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Table Of Contents RANDOM .................................................................................................. 12-18 SHA1^HASH ............................................................................................. 12-19 TRACK^LEN ............................................................................................. 12-20 UT^FNAMECOLLAPSE ............................................................................ 12-21 WIDTH ...................................................................................................... 12-22

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Section 1 Introduction ACI Utilities Overview The ACI Utilities are a collection of “utility” PROCs distributed on the ACIUTILS subvolume. These utilities are considered “release independent” of ACI products. The utilities are contained in a BINDable object file, and are distributed only in object file form. Contained on the same subvolume are ACI Utilities external files and C language prototype files, documentation files, as well as the Supercrypt Utility files. The utility PROCs are described in this document. For information on the Supercrypt Utility files see the BASE24 Transaction Security Manual. The contents of this subvolume are briefly described below: CLUTILE C Language externals – Large model. CWUTILE C Language externals – Wide model. D30UTILB NSK D30 version of UTILB. KEYUTIL Supercrypt Library. KEYUTILE External file for KEYUTIL SKCRYPT Supercrypt Tool. SYSMSGS TAL source code with STRUCTs for system messages. UTILB ACI Utility Library, NSK C30 version by default. UTILDEFS ACI Utility Library DEFINEs and STRUCTs. UTILEXTS External declarations for ACI Utility Library. UTILHIST History of changes to ACI Utility Library Source File. UTILUPDT Documentation detailing changes to ACIUTILS subvolume contents. This manual contains a section giving examples of how to use Compaq’s NSK BIND program to BIND in the utilities you require. It is important to note that many of the procedures in this manual remain for backward compatibility. Before using procedures in ACI Utilities for new development, it is important to do some research. It may be that better alternatives have been developed in an ACI Product specific utility library (i.e. BASE Utilities or ATM Utilities), or that Compaq has introduced a comparable procedure into the NSK run time library.

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Introduction Utility Procs – File Description

Utility Procs – File Description The utility PROCs have been grouped into files on $.ACIUTILS. For the purposes of this document, $ represents the volume on a given system where ACIUTILS is installed. Since most ACI products refer to ACIUTILS using file defines, the location isn’t critical. There are twelve files that make up the utility subvol. Following is a description of their contents. CLUTILE C Language externals – Large model. This file contains C programming language prototypes for ACI Utilities. 1.

CWUTILE

C Language externals – Wide model. This file contains C programming language prototypes for ACI Utilities.

2.

D30UTILB

NSK D30 version of UTILB. This is a BINDable object file compiled with Compaq’s NSK D30 operating system compilers.

3.

KEYUTIL

Supercrypt Library. The Supercrypt Library and Tools are described in the BASE24 Transaction Security Manual.

4.

KEYUTILE

External file for KEYUTIL

5.

SKCRYPT

Supercrypt Tool.

6.

SYSMSGS

TAL source code with STRUCTs for system messages.

7.

UTILB

ACI Utility Library, currently Compaq’s NSK C30 version.

8.

UTILDEFS

ACI Utility Library DEFINEs and STRUCTs.

9.

UTILEXTS

TAL External declarations for ACI Utility Library.

10.

UTILHIST

History of changes to ACI Utility Library Source File. Since the utilities are not distributed in source file form, the history sections are distributed to customers in this file.

11.

UTILUPDT

Documentation detailing changes to ACIUTILS subvolume contents. As files on ACIUTILS are added and removed, these changes should be documented here.

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Introduction Procedures for Using Utilities

Procedures for Using Utilities The utility library configuration has been designed to facilitate the use of the NSK BIND program. For the compilation of your source program, you may need $.ACIUTILS.UTILEXTS, the externals file and depending on usage $.ACIUTILS.UTILDEFS, if TAL structures and defines are required, and optionally, $.ACIUTILS.CWUTILE if a C language source file (wide model) is being used. The files needed to run BIND are $.ACIUTILS.UTILB and the object code file. In these examples, the following NSK TACL File Defines will be used to point to these source files. TACL> TACL> TACL> TACL>

add add add add

define define define define

=aciutils_utilexts, =aciutils_cwutile, =aciutils_utilb, =aciutils_utildefs,

file file file file

$.ACIUTILS.UTILEXTS $.ACIUTILS.CWUTILE $.ACIUTILS.UTILB $.ACIUTILS.UTILDEFS

Following is an example of how to use NSK BIND. For more information on the different commands and their parameters, see Compaq’s Binder Manual. Example: Following is a description of how to BIND in the library utilities ASCII^INTEGER, ADD^DOUBLE, and WIDTH. These utilities were only chosen as an example. These procedures will work for any of the utilities. To compile the source program that refers to any of the library utilities, the external declaration for each utility needed must be SOURCEd in. For this example you would need: ?source =ACIUTILS_UTILEXTS ( ? ASCII^INTEGER, ? ADD^DOUBLE, ? WIDTH )

The C Language equivelent is: #include “=aciutils_cwutile ( \ ASCII_INTEGER, \ ADD_DOUBLE, \ WIDTH )” NOLIST

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Introduction Procedures for Using Utilities Note: The carrot character (‘^’) is changed to an underscore character (‘_’) in C. The prototypes are specified in both all upper and all lower case. Since C is case sensitive both options are provided. The NOLIST directive is optional. The next step is to create an edit file (BIND can be run interactively, but an edit file allows you to reuse the commands without having to type them in each time). This file should contain the following information: ADD * FROM SELECT SEARCH =ACIUTILS_UTILB BUILD newfile!

c d e

c Selects all PROCs, global code and global data from your object file. d Instructs BIND to resolve unresolved externals with code sections from =ACIUTILS_UTILB. e Creates a new object program file "newfile" containing the object code from "yourfile" and the utilities.

To execute these commands, enter: TACL> BIND /IN editfile/

This will produce the new bound object code. Several of the procedures require STRUCT definitions or DEFINEs. These require the use of the definitions file on =ACIUTILS_UTILDEFS. Following is an example of the how to use the TIMER procs, which require STRUCT templates from the definitions file. To compile your source program, you need to SOURCE the following statement into the section of your program where you define STRUCT templates: ?source =ACIUTILS_UTILDEFS( timer^structs )

Note: C Language equivalents are not available for data structures and defines in the ACI Utilities Sources. You will also need to SOURCE in the following EXTERNAL declarations: ?source =ACIUTILS_UTILEXTS( TIMER^INIT, ? NEXT^EXPIRE^TIME, ? TIMER^DELETE, ? TIMER^INSERT, ? TIMER^EXPIRED, ? FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMER )

To create the edit file containing the BIND commands, the same procedures can be used as described in the preceding example. 1-4

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Introduction Syntax Conventions

Syntax Conventions The following is a summary of the characters and symbols used in the syntax notation for the utility procedures in this manual. The syntax standards follow those used by Tandem. NOTATION

MEANING

UPPER-CASE CHARACTERS

All keywords appear in capital letters. A keyword is defined as one that must be present for the procedure to work properly.



All variable entries supplied by the user are shown in lowercase characters and enclosed in angle brackets. If the entry is required, it is underlined; otherwise, it is optional.

Punctuation

All punctuation and symbols must be entered precisely as shown. The only exception is the repeat symbol (. . .) that appears in some procedures.

System Procedure Calls

Calls to the utility procedures are shown in the following form: CALL ( ) or := ( ) CALL is a TAL CALL statement. " :=" indicates that procedure is a function procedure. (I.e., it returns a value of the indicated when referenced in an expression.) is the name of the utility procedure. Required parts of the calling sequence are underlined. Optional parameters may be omitted, but placeholder commas (‘,’) must be present except for right-side omitted parameters. A function procedure's return value is described as follows: ,

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Introduction Syntax Conventions NOTATION

MEANING is INT, INT(32), STRING, or FIXED [ ( ) ] A function procedure can be called with a CALL statement, but the return value will be lost. are described as follows: ,:ref: or value is INT, INT(32), STRING or FIXED [ ( ) ] ‘ref’ indicates a reference parameter. indicates that the procedure returns a value of to for . ‘value’ indicates a value parameter.

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Section 2 Arithmetic Overflow Prevention These routines are designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps. There are routines for both addition and multiplication, on INT, DOUBLE, and FIXED variables.

ADD^DOUBLE This routine was designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps when adding several double-word variables. The routine returns the result of the operation in if an overflow does not occur. If over-flow occurs, the PROC returns FALSE in . Syntax: := ADD^DOUBLE( , , , , . . . ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if an overflow occurs or if is not passed as a parameter.

, INT(32):ref,

if present, contains the result of the addition if no overflow occurs.

..., INT(32):ref,

are the possible double-words to be added. Any subset of these variables will be accepted. If none are present, will be 0.

example: stat := ADD^DOUBLE( result, val1, val2, val3, val4 )

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Arithmetic Overflow Prevention ADD^DOUBLEX (extended address version)

ADD^DOUBLEX (extended address version) This routine was designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps when adding several double-word variables. The routine returns the result of the operation in if an overflow does not occur. If overflow occurs, the PROC returns FALSE in . Syntax: := ADD^DOUBLEX( , , , , . . . ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if an overflow occurs or if is not passed as a parameter.

, INT(32):ref,

if present, contains the result of the addition if no overflow occurs.

..., INT(32):ref,

are the possible double-words to be added. Any subset of these variables will be accepted. If none are present, will be 0.

example: stat := ADD^DOUBLEX( resultx, val1, val2, val3, val4 )

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Arithmetic Overflow Prevention ADD^FIXED

ADD^FIXED This routine was designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps when adding several FIXED (64 bit) variables. The routine returns the result of the operation in if an overflow does not occur. If overflow occurs, the PROC returns FALSE in . The user is responsible for decimal alignment. Syntax: := ADD^FIXED( , , , , . . . ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if an overflow occurs or if is not passed as a parameter.

, FIXED:ref,

if present, contains the result of the addition if no overflow occurs.

..., FIXED:ref,

are the possible FIXED variables to be added. Any subset of these variables will be accepted. If none are present, will be 0.

example: stat := ADD^FIXED( result, val1, val2, val3, val4 )

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Arithmetic Overflow Prevention ADD^FIXEDX (extended address version)

ADD^FIXEDX (extended address version) This routine was designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps when adding several FIXED (64 bit) variables. The routine returns the result of the operation in if an overflow does not occur. If overflow occurs, the PROC returns FALSE in . The user is responsible for decimal alignment. Syntax: := ADD^FIXEDX( , , , ,… ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if an overflow occurs or if is not passed as a parameter.

, FIXED:ref,

if present, contains the result of the addition if no overflow occurs.

..., FIXED:ref,

are the possible FIXED variables to be added. Any subset of these variables will be accepted. If none are present, will be 0.

example: stat := ADD^FIXEDX( resultx, val1, val2, val3, val4 )

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Arithmetic Overflow Prevention ADD^INT

ADD^INT This routine was designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps when adding several INT variables. The routine returns the result of the operation in if an overflow does not occur. If overflow occurs, the PROC returns FALSE. Syntax: := ADD^INT( , , , , , ... ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if an overflow occurs or if is not passed as a parameter.

, INT:ref,

if present, contains the result of the addition if no overflow occurs.

..., INT:ref,

are the possible INT variables to be added. Any subset of these variables will be accepted. If no values are supplied, is 0.

example: stat := ADD^INT( result, val1, val2, val3, val4 )

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Arithmetic Overflow Prevention ADD^INTX (extended address version)

ADD^INTX (extended address version) This routine was designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps when adding several INT variables. The routine returns the result of the operation in if an overflow does not occur. If overflow occurs, the PROC returns FALSE. Syntax: := ADD^INTX( , , , , , ... ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if an overflow occurs or if is not passed as a parameter.

, INT:ref,

if present, contains the result of the addition if no overflow occurs.

..., INT:ref,

are the possible INT variables to be added. Any subset of these variables will be accepted. If no values are supplied, is 0.

example: stat := ADD^INTX( resultx, val1, val2, val3, val4 )

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Arithmetic Overflow Prevention MULT^DOUBLE

MULT^DOUBLE This routine was designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps when multiplying several double-word variables. The routine returns the result of the operation in if an overflow does not occur. If overflow occurs, the PROC returns FALSE. Syntax: := MULT^DOUBLE( , , , , . . . ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if an overflow occurs or if is not passed as a parameter.

, INT(32):ref,

if present, contains the result of the multiplication if no overflow occurs.

..., INT(32):ref,

are the possible double-words to be multiplied. Any subset of these variables will be accepted. If none are present, will be 1.

example: stat := MULT^DOUBLE( result, val1, val2, val3 )

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Arithmetic Overflow Prevention MULT^DOUBLEX (extended address version)

MULT^DOUBLEX (extended address version) This routine was designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps when multiplying several double-word variables. The routine returns the result of the operation in if an overflow does not occur. If overflow occurs, the PROC returns FALSE. Syntax: := MULT^DOUBLEX( , , , , . . . ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if an overflow occurs or if is not passed as a parameter.

, INT(32):ref,

if present, contains the result of the multiplication if no overflow occurs.

..., INT(32):ref,

are the possible double-words to be multiplied. Any subset of these variables will be accepted. If none are present, will be 1.

example: stat := MULT^DOUBLEX( resultx, val1, val2, val3 )

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Arithmetic Overflow Prevention MULT^FIXED

MULT^FIXED This routine was designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps when multiplying several FIXED (64 bit) variables. The routine returns the result of the operation in if an overflow does not occur. If overflow occurs, the PROC returns FALSE. The user is responsible for decimal alignment. Syntax: := MULT^FIXED( , , , , . . . ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if an overflow occurs or if is not passed as a parameter.

, FIXED(*):ref,

if present, contains the result of the multiplication if no overflow occurs.

. . . , FIXED(*):ref, are the possible FIXED variables to be multiplied. Any subset of these variables will be accepted. If none are present, will be 1. example: stat := MULT^FIXED( result, val1, val2, val3 )

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Arithmetic Overflow Prevention MULT^FIXEDX (extended address version)

MULT^FIXEDX (extended address version) This routine was designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps when multiplying several FIXED (64 bit) variables. The routine returns the result of the operation in if an overflow does not occur. If overflow occurs, the PROC returns FALSE. The user is responsible for decimal alignment. Syntax: := MULT^FIXEDX( , , , , . . . ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if an overflow occurs or if is not passed as a parameter.

, FIXED(*):ref,

if present, contains the result of the multiplication if no overflow occurs.

. . . , FIXED(*):ref, are the possible FIXED variables to be multiplied. Any subset of these variables will be accepted. If none are present, will be 1. example: stat := MULT^FIXEDX( resultx, val1, val2, val3 )

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Arithmetic Overflow Prevention MULT^INT

MULT^INT This routine was designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps when multiplying several INT variables. The routine returns the result of the operation in if an overflow does not occur. If overflow occurs, the PROC returns FALSE. Syntax: := MULT^INT( , , , . . . ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if an overflow occurs or if is not passed as a parameter.

, INT:ref,

if present, contains the result of the multiplication if no overflow occurs.

..., INT:ref,

are the possible INT variables to be multiplied. Any subset of these variables will be accepted. If no values are supplied, is 1.

example: stat := MULT^INT( result, val1, val2, val3, val4 )

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Arithmetic Overflow Prevention MULT^INTX (extended address version)

MULT^INTX (extended address version) This routine was designed to prevent arithmetic overflow traps when multiplying several INT variables. The routine returns the result of the operation in if an overflow does not occur. If overflow occurs, the PROC returns FALSE. Syntax: := MULT^INTX( , , , . . . ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if an overflow occurs or if is not passed as a parameter.

, INT:ref,

if present, contains the result of the multiplication if no overflow occurs.

..., INT:ref,

are the possible INT variables to be multiplied. Any subset of these variables will be accepted. If no values are supplied, is 1.

example: stat := MULT^INTX( resultx, val1, val2, val3, val4 )

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Section 3 Bit Manipulation CLEARBIT Clears a bit of a vector. Syntax: CALL CLEARBIT( , ) where: , INT:ref,

is the bit vector to be modified.

, INT,

is the bit to be cleared; the value of must be in the range: [ 0:(# words in * 16) - 1 ].

example: INT

bit^array[ 0:19 ], bit;

bit := 25; CALL CLEARBIT( bit^array, bit ); NOTE:

It is up to the user to insure that the value of lies in the defined range; this PROC has no knowledge of the declared length of .

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Bit Manipulation CLEAR^BITX (extended address version)

CLEAR^BITX (extended address version) Clears a bit of a vector. Syntax: CALL CLEAR^BITX( , ) where: , INT:ref,

is the bit vector to be modified.

, INT,

is the bit to be cleared; the value of must be in the range: [ 0:(# words in * 16) - 1 ].

example: INT

.ext bit^arrayx[ 0:19 ], bit;

bit := 25; CALL CLEAR^BITX( bit^arrayx, bit ); NOTE:

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It is up to the user to insure that the value of lies in the defined range; this PROC has no knowledge of the declared length of .

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Bit Manipulation SETBIT

SETBIT Sets a bit of a vector. Syntax: CALL SETBIT( , ) where: , INT:ref,

is the bit vector to be modified.

, INT,

is the bit to be set; the value of must be in the range: [ 0:(# words in * 16) - 1 ].

example: INT

bit^array[ 0:19 ], bit;

bit := 25; CALL SETBIT( bit^array, bit ); NOTE:

It is up to the user to insure that the value of lies in the defined range; this PROC has no knowledge of the declared length of .

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Bit Manipulation SET^BITX (extended address version)

SET^BITX (extended address version) Sets a bit of a vector. Syntax: CALL SET^BITX( , ) where: , INT:ref,

is the bit vector to be modified.

, INT,

is the bit to be set; the value of must be in the range: [ 0:(# words in * 16) - 1 ].

example: INT

.ext bit^arrayx[ 0:19 ], bit;

bit := 25; CALL SET^BITX( bit^arrayx, bit ); NOTE:

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It is up to the user to insure that the value of lies in the defined range; this PROC has no knowledge of the declared length of .

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Bit Manipulation TESTBIT

TESTBIT Returns a TRUE/FALSE value as determined by the state of the bit in question of a bit vector. Syntax: := TESTBIT( , ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE ( non-zero ) if the bit in question is set; otherwise, it returns FALSE (0).

, INT:ref,

is the bit vector to be tested.

, INT,

is the bit to be tested; the value of must be in the range: [ 0:(# words in * 16) - 1 ]

example: INT

bit^array[ 0:19 ], bit;

bit := 25; IF TESTBIT( bit^array, bit ) THEN ... !bit on ELSE ... !bit off NOTE:

It is up to the user to insure that the value of lies in the defined range; this PROC has no knowledge of the declared length of .

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Bit Manipulation TEST^BITX (extended address version)

TEST^BITX (extended address version) Returns a TRUE/FALSE value as determined by the state of the bit in question of a bit vector. Syntax: := TEST^BITX( , ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE ( non-zero ) if the bit in question is set; otherwise, it returns FALSE (0).

, INT:ref,

is the bit vector to be tested.

, INT,

is the bit to be tested; the value of must be in the range: [ 0:(# words in * 16) - 1 ]

example: INT

.ext bit^arrayx[ 0:19 ], bit;

bit := 25; IF TEST^BITX( bit^arrayx, bit ) THEN ... !bit on ELSE ... !bit off NOTE:

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It is up to the user to insure that the value of lies in the defined range; this PROC has no knowledge of the declared length of .

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Section 4 Circular Linked List Procs Overview An item in a circular linked list contains data coupled with pointers to the previous and next items in the list.

POINTER TO PREV

POINTER TO NEXT

DATA ELEMENT OR POINTER TO DATA

When several of these items are combined, they may form a circular linked list similar to the following: @A @E

@D @B

ITEM 1

@C

@B @E

ITEM 4

@A

@E @C

ITEM 2

@D

@C @A

ITEM 5

@B

@D

ITEM 3

At the beginning of the linked list is an entry whose pointer to the previous item contains the address of the last item in the list. Its pointer to the next item contains the address of the item following it in the list. The next item pointer of the beginning entry in the linked list will point to the beginning entry itself if there are no entries in the circular linked list. These two PROCs take care of the previous and next pointer linkages. The programmer must provide the definition of the linked list and the data to be kept in it (usually timers).

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Circular Linked List Procs CL^DELETE

CL^DELETE Deletes an item from a circular linked list by adjusting the appropriate linkages. Syntax: := CL^DELETE( ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if the linkages are invalid; otherwise, TRUE (-1) is returned.

, INT,

is the address of the item to be deleted. The first two words at this address must be the address of the previous entry, followed by the address of the next entry.

example: STRUCT BEGIN INT INT STRING END; INT

.list^item[ 0:max ]; prev^item; nxt^item; item^contents[ 0:contents^max ]; cur;

cur := 6; stat := CL^DELETE( @list^item[ cur ] );

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Circular Linked List Procs CL^INSERT

CL^INSERT Adds an item to a circular linked list by adjusting the appropriate linkages. No data is entered into the list. Syntax: := CL^INSERT( , ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if the linkages in are invalid; otherwise, returns TRUE (-1).

, INT,

is the address of an item already in the list. The first two words at this address must be the address of the previous entry, followed by the address of the next entry.

, INT,

is the address of the item to be added after the above item. This is physically located in an empty slot in the linked list.

example: STRUCT BEGIN INT INT STRING END; INT

.list^item[ 0:max ]; prev^item; nxt^item; item^contents [ 0:contents^max ]; end^of^list, avail;

end^of^list := 75; avail := 3; IF CL^INSERT( @list^item[ end^of^list ], @list^item [ avail ] ) THEN ... !valid linkage ELSE ... !error condition

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Circular Linked List Procs CL^INSERT

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Section 5 COBOL Processing These utilities were written to aid the COBOL programmer in file management when writing COBOL programs.

COBOL^ALTERPRIORITY Used to change the priority of a process. Syntax: := COBOL^ALTERPRIORITY( , ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE (non-zero) if an error occurred.

, INT:ref:4,

is the process identification number. This is passed from a call to COBOL^GETCRTPID.

, INT,

specifies a new execution priority value in the range of 1:199 for .

NOTE:

The utility library file $ACIUTILS.UTILB must be declared in the SPECIAL-NAMES section of the COBOL program. In the following example the SPECIAL-NAMES section would contain: SPECIAL-NAMES.

FILE $.ACIUTILS.UTILB IS ctalutil.

example: 01 01 01

STAT PID PRIORITY

PIC 99. PIC 9999 PIC 99

COMP. COMP

VALUE 100.

ENTER TAL "COBOL^ALTERPRIORITY" IN CTALUTIL USING PID, PRIORITY GIVING STAT.

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COBOL Processing COBOL^CREATE

COBOL^CREATE Creates a file. (See the CREATE Procedure in the Guardian Operating System Programming manual for a complete description of the parameters). Syntax: := COBOL^CREATE (, , , , , , , , , ) where: , INT,

returns the file error number if an error occurred. Otherwise, returns FALSE (0).

, INT:ref:12,

is the name of the disk file to be created. See the Guardian Operating System Programming manual for file formats.

, INT,

if present, is the size of the primary extent in 2048-byte units. Default is 1 (2048 bytes).

, INT,

if present, is an application defined file code. Default is 0.

, INT,

if present, is the size of the secondary extent. Default is the same as the primary extent size.

, INT,

if present, specifies the type of file to be created. Default is unstructured.

, INT,

if present, is the maximum length of the record in bytes. Default is 80.

, INT,

if present, is the length of each block of records in the file. Default is 1024.

, STRING:ref:6, if present, contains parameters that define this file. Required for key-sequenced files.

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COBOL Processing COBOL^CREATE , STRING:ref

if present, contains parameters containing any alternate keys for this file.

, STRING:ref

if present, contains parameters describing this file if the file is a multi-volume file.

NOTE:

The utility library file $.ACIUTILS.UTILB must be declared in the SPECIAL-NAMES section of the COBOL program. In the following example the SPECIAL-NAMES section would contain: SPECIAL-NAMES. FILE $.ACITUILS.UTILB IS CTALUTIL.

example: 01 STAT 01 COMMAND-FILE. 02 FNAME. 03 VOL 03 SVOL 03 NAM 02 PRI-EXT 02 FILE-CDE 02 SECNDRY-EXT 02 FILE-TYP 02 REC-LGTH 02 BLK-LGTH

PIC 99

COMP.

PIC X(8) PIC X(8) PIC X(8) PIC S9(4) PIC S9(4) PIC S9(4) PIC S9(4) PIC S9(4) PIC S9(4)

VALUE "$DATA1". VALUE "PROJ ". VALUE "TEST ". COMP VALUE 10. COMP VALUE 25. COMP VALUE 6. COMP VALUE 0. COMP VALUE 130. COMP VALUE 4096.

ENTER TAL "COBOL^CREATE" IN CTALUTIL USING FNAME, PRI-EXT, FILE-CDE, SECNDRY-EXT, FILE-TYP, REC-LGTH, BLK-LGTH GIVING STAT.

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COBOL Processing COBOL^DELAY

COBOL^DELAY Puts the COBOL program into a delay that does not use up CPU time. Syntax: CALL COBOL^DELAY( ) where: , INT(32),

NOTE:

is the number of hundreths of seconds to delay. An amount of 100 = 1 second of delay.

The utility library file $.ACIUTILS.UTILB must be declared in the SPECIAL-NAMES section of the COBOL program. In the following example the SPECIAL-NAMES section would contain: SPECIAL-NAMES. FILE $.ACIUTILS.UTILB IS CTALUTIL.

example: 01

AMT

PIC 9999

COMP

VALUE 300.

ENTER TAL "COBOL^DELAY" IN CTALUTIL USING AMT.

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COBOL Processing COBOL^GETCRTPID

COBOL^GETCRTPID Returns the PID of the calling COBOL program. Syntax: := COBOL^GETCRTPID( ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE (non-zero) if an error occurred.

, INT:ref,

is the PID of the calling COBOL program.

NOTE:

The utility library file $.ACIUTILS.UTILB must be declared in the SPECIAL-NAMES section of the COBOL program. In the following example the SPECIAL-NAMES section would contain: SPECIAL-NAMES.

FILE $.ACIUTILS.UTILB IS CTALUTIL.

example: 01 01

STAT PID

PIC 99 PIC 99.

COMP.

ENTER TAL "COBOL^GETCRTPID" IN CTALUTIL USING PID GIVING STAT.

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COBOL Processing COBOL^GETFILENUM

COBOL^GETFILENUM Returns the file number and/or an error given the file name as input. File must have been opened once before passing it to this procedure. Syntax: := COBOL^GETFILENUM( , ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE (non-zero) if an error occurred.

, STRING:ref:24,

is the name of the input file.

, INT:ref,

contains the file number associated with the input file name.

NOTE:

The utility library file $.ACIUTILS.UTILB must be declared in the SPECIAL-NAMES section of the COBOL program. In the following example the SPECIAL-NAMES section would contain: SPECIAL-NAMES.

FILE $.ACIUTILS.UTILB IS CTALUTIL.

example: 01 MY-FNAME. 02 VOL 02 SVOL 02 NAME 01 FNUM 01 STAT

PIC X(8) PIC X(8) PIC X(8) PIC 99 COMP. PIC 99 COMP.

VALUE "$DATA1 ". VALUE "PROJ ". VALUE "TEST ".

ENTER TAL "COBOL^GETFILENUM" IN CTALUTIL USING MY-FNAME, FNUM GIVING STAT.

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COBOL Processing COBOL^LOOKUPPPD

COBOL^LOOKUPPPD Checks for a PPD entry associated with the input process name. Syntax: := COBOL^LOOKUPPPD( ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE (non-zero) if the entry exists.

, STRING:ref:18,

contains the input process name.

NOTE:

The utility library file $.ACIUTILS.UTILB must be declared in the SPECIAL-NAMES section of the COBOL program. In the following example the SPECIAL-NAMES section would contain: SPECIAL-NAMES. FILE $.ACIUTILS.UTILB IS CTALUTIL.

example: 01 STAT 01 INPUT-PRO-NAM

PIC 99. PIC X(18) VALUE "\SYSTEM.$PPD1

".

ENTER TAL "COBOL^LOOKUPPPD" IN CTALUTIL USING INPUT-PROCESS-NAME GIVING STAT.

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COBOL Processing COBOL^PURGE

COBOL^PURGE Used to delete a disk file. Syntax: := COBOL^PURGE( ) where: , INT,

returns the error number if one occurred. Otherwise, FALSE (0) is returned.

, STRING:ref

contains the name of the disk file to be purged.

NOTE:

The utility library file $.ACIUTILS.UTILB must be declared in the SPECIAL-NAMES section of the COBOL program. In the following example the SPECIAL-NAMES section would contain: SPECIAL-NAMES.

FILE $.ACIUTILS.UTILB IS CTALUTIL.

example: 01 MY-FNAME. 02 VOL 02 SVOL 02 NAME 01 STAT

PIC X(8) PIC X(8) PIC X(8) PIC 99

VALUE "$DATA1 ". VALUE "PROJ ". VALUE "TEST ". COMP.

ENTER TAL "COBOL^PURGE" IN CTALUTILB USING MY-FNAME GIVING STAT.

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COBOL Processing COBOL^RENAME

COBOL^RENAME Used to change the name of a disk file. Syntax: := COBOL^RENAME( , ) where: , INT,

returns the error number if one occurred. Otherwise, FALSE (0) is returned.

, STRING:ref:24,

contains the name of the disk file to be renamed.

, STRING:ref:24,

contains the file name to be assigned to the disk file.

NOTE:

The utility library file $.ACIUTILS.UTILB must be declared in the SPECIAL-NAMES section of the COBOL program. In the following example the SPECIAL-NAMES section would contain: SPECIAL-NAMES.

FILE $.ACIUTILS.UTILB IS CTALUTIL.

example: 01 OLD-FNAME. 02 VOL 02 SVOL 02 NAM

PIC X(8) PIC X(8) PIC X(8)

01 NEW-FNAME. 02 VOL PIC X(8) 02 SVOL PIC X(8) 02 NAM PIC X(8) 01 STAT PIC 99

VALUE "$DATA1 ". VALUE "PROJ ". VALUE "TEST ". VALUE "$DATA1 ". VALUE "PROJ ". VALUE "PRODUCT ". COMP.

ENTER TAL "COBOL^RENAME" IN CTALUTIL USING OLD-FNAME, NEW-FNAME GIVING STAT.

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COBOL Processing COBOL^RENAME

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Section 6 Date and Time Conversions The majority of the date and time conversion PROCs detailed on the following pages contain no input validation routines. Consequently, an invalid timearray or timestamp input will yield unpredictable results. These are standard Tandem timestamps and timearrays as described in the TIME and TIMESTAMP procedures in the Guardian Procedure Calls Reference Manual.

ASCII^JULIAN^TIMESTAMP Converts a date in YYYYMMDD format and a time in HHMMSSMMMMMM format to a Julian timestamp. Syntax: := ASCII^JULIAN^TIMESTAMP( , , ) where: , INT,

contains TRUE (-1) if the conversion is successful, otherwise FALSE (0).

, STRING:ref:8,

is an 8 byte string containing the date in YYYYMMDD format.

, STRING:ref:12,

is a 12 byte string containing the time in HHMMSSMMMMMM format.

, FIXED(0):ref,

is the converted Julian timestamp.

example: FIXED STRING

julian^ts; .ascii^dat[ 0:7 ], .ascii^tim[ 0:11 ];

ascii^dat ':=' "20001015"; ascii^tim ':=' "120000000000"; ! noon IF NOT ascii^julian^timestamp( ascii^dat, ascii^tim, julian^ts ) THEN BEGIN ! handle error condition here END; Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

6-1

Date and Time Conversions ASCII^TIMESTAMP

ASCII^TIMESTAMP Converts a string YYMMDDHHMMSSHH to a 48 bit timestamp form. Syntax: := ASCII^TIMESTAMP( , , ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE (-1) for normal execution, otherwise FALSE (0) if conversion was not possible.

, STRING:ref,

is the string containing the time in the form of and is up to 14 bytes long.

, INT:val,

is the number of bytes of to use when creating the timestamp.

, INT:ref:3,

a 48 bit timestamp as obtained from a call to the NSK 'TIMESTAMP' procedure.

example: INT STRING

ts[ 0:2 ]; .ascii^ts[ 0:13 ];

ascii^ts ':=' "83062312000000"; ! high noon IF NOT ascii^timestamp( ascii^ts, 14, ts ) THEN BEGIN ! handle error condition here END; Note: If “YY” is less than 75, it is assumed to be 20YY otherwise it is assumed to be 19YY.

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Date and Time Conversions BUMP^DAY

BUMP^DAY Receives a time array (as set up by the call to "TIME") increments that date by one day and returns a binary value of the new date. Syntax: CALL BUMP^DAY( , , yyyymmdd^bin ); where: , INT:ref,

contains the current date and time as received from the call to "TIME".

, INT(32):ref,

contains the new date in binary form "YYMMDD."

, INT(32):ref,

contains the new date in binary form "YYYYMMDD."

example: INT INT(32)

.timarray[ 0:6 ]; new^dd^bin, yyyymmdd^bin;

CALL TIME( timarray ); CALL BUMP^DAY( timarray, new^dd^bin, yyyymmdd^bin );

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6-3

Date and Time Conversions BUMP^YYMMDD

BUMP^YYMMDD Adds a specified number of days to an ASCII YYMMDD date string. Syntax: CALL BUMP^YYMMDD( , ); where: , STRING:ref,

contains the original date string for input and the modified date after the change.

, INT,

contains the number of days to add to the date string. It is optional. The default, if this is omitted, is 1.

example: STRING INT

.yymmdd[ 0:5 ]; num^days;

yymmdd ':=' "991231"; num^days := 9; CALL BUMP^YYMMDD( yymmdd, num^days ); Note: If “YY” is less than 75, it is assumed to be 20YY otherwise it is assumed to be 19YY.

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Date and Time Conversions CLOCK^TIME

CLOCK^TIME Returns a character string containing the time in the form HH:MM:SS AM or HH:MM:SS PM. Syntax: CALL CLOCK^TIME( ); where: , STRING:ref:11,

is an array which, upon return from the PROC, will contain the time in the form HH:MM:SS AM -or- PM.

example: STRING

.hold^formatted^tim[ 0:10 ];

CALL CLOCK^TIME( hold^formatted^tim );

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6-5

Date and Time Conversions COMPARE^ASCII^YYMMDD

COMPARE^ASCII^YYMMDD This utility compares, according to the supplied operator, two 6-byte string dates in YYMMDD format. Prior to comparison, the 6-byte dates are expanded from YYMMDD to YYYYMMDD format, allowing comparisons between dates in the 20th and 21st centuries. If a supplied date's 2- digit year YY falls in the range 00-74, the date is expanded to 20YYMMDD. If a supplied date's 2-digit year YY falls in the range 75- 99, the date is expanded to 19YYMMDD. NOTE: If either supplied date is all spaces, zeroes or binary zeroes, it is expanded to eight bytes of spaces, zeroes or binary zeroes. Syntax: := COMPARE^ASCII^YYMMDD( , , ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE if the comparison evaluates to TRUE; returns FALSE if the comparison evaluates to FALSE.

, STRING:ref:6,

is the left half of the comparison - a 6-byte ASCII date in YYMMDD format.

, INT:value,

is the relational operator indicating how to compare the halves. Following are the possible values.

Value 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Operator < > = '' '='

, STRING:ref:6,

6-6

Description signed less than signed greater than signed less than or equal to signed greater than or equal to unsigned less than unsigned greater than unsigned less than or equal to unsigned greater than or equal to

is the right half of the comparison - a 6-byte ASCII date in YYMMDD format.

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Date and Time Conversions COMPARE^ASCII^YYMMDD example: STRING

.yymmdd^1[ 0:5 ], .yymmdd^2[ 0:5 ];

yymmdd^1 ':=' "991231"; yymmdd^2 ':=' "000101"; IF COMPARE^ASCII^YYMMDD( yymmdd^1, 3 ! =

Description signed less than signed greater than signed less than or equal to signed greater than or equal to

is the right half of the comparison - a binary date in YYMMDD format.

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Date and Time Conversions COMPARE^BINARY^YYMMDD example: INT(32)

dat^1, dat^2;

dat^1 := 991231d; dat^2 := 000101d; IF COMPARE^BINARY^YYMMDD( dat^1, 3 !" = %B0011000100111110 converts to which contains %B00011110 Syntax: := GRAPHIC^HEX( , ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE (non-zero) if the conversion was successful.

, INT:ref,

contains the graphic string to be converted.

, INT:ref,

contains the converted code in packed binary format.

example: INT

.graphic^str[ 0:7 ], .binary^str[ 0:3 ];

graphic^str

':=' "123456:=";

IF GRAPHIC^HEX( graphic^str, binary^str ) THEN ! successful ELSE ! error

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Format Conversion Procs HEXCHAR^BINARY

HEXCHAR^BINARY Converts data representing hex digits in ASCII display form to internal binary form. Each 8 bits representing a character in has its corresponding binary value packed into the next subsequent 4 bits in . For example, containing %B0011000101000101 = "1E" converts to containing %B00011110 ( i.e., a binary 1 in 4 bits followed by a binary 14 in the next 4 bits) Syntax: := HEXCHAR^BINARY( , , ) where:

9-46

, INT,

returns FALSE (0) if is not an even number or if contains characters other than 1-9 or A-F; otherwise, TRUE (-1) is returned.

, STRING:ref,

contains the hexadecimal string to be converted.

, INT,

contains the length, in bytes, of the array to be converted. must be an even number.

, STRING:ref,

contains the result of the hex to binary conversion.

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Format Conversion Procs HEXCHAR^BINARY example: STRING INT STRING

.hex^str[ 0:15 ]; hex^lgth; .binary^str[ 0:7 ];

hex^str ':=' "0123456789ABCDEF"; hex^lgth := 16; IF HEXCHAR^BINARY( hex^str, hex^lgth, binary^str ) THEN ! successful ELSE ! error

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Format Conversion Procs HEXCHAR^BINARYX (extended address version)

HEXCHAR^BINARYX (extended address version) Converts data representing hex digits in ASCII display form to internal binary form. Each 8 bits representing a character in has its corresponding binary value packed into the next subsequent 4 bits in . For example, containing %B0011000101000101 = "1E" converts to containing %B00011110 (i.e., a binary 1 in 4 bits followed by a binary 14 in the next 4 bits) Syntax: := HEXCHAR^BINARYX( , , ) where:

9-48

, INT,

returns FALSE (0) if is not an even number or if contains characters other than 1-9 or A-F; otherwise, TRUE (-1) is returned.

, STRING.EXT:ref,

contains the hexadecimal string to be converted.

, INT,

contains the length, in bytes, of the array to be converted. must be an even number.

, STRING.EXT:ref,

contains the result of the hex to binary conversion.

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Format Conversion Procs HEXCHAR^BINARYX (extended address version) example: STRING .ext hex^strx[ 0:15 ]; INT hex^lgth; STRING .ext binary^strx[ 0:7 ]; hex^strx ':=' "0123456789ABCDEF"; hex^lgth := 16; IF HEXCHAR^BINARYX( hex^strx, hex^len,binary^strx ) THEN ! successful ELSE ! error

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Format Conversion Procs HEXCHAR^INTEGER

HEXCHAR^INTEGER Converts a single hex character value ("0"-"F") into its integer equivalent (0-15). If the hex character to be converted is invalid, the PROC returns FALSE. Syntax: := HEXCHAR^INTEGER( , ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if the hex character is invalid and returns TRUE (-1) if the conversion is successful.

, STRING:ref,

is the single hex character to be converted to its integer equivalent.

, INT:ref,

contains the result of the conversion from the hex character to its integer equivalent.

example: INT

9-50

STRING

stat, intval; hexval;

hexval stat

:= "A"; := HEXCHAR^INTEGER( hexval, intval );

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Format Conversion Procs INTEGER^ASCII

INTEGER^ASCII Converts an INT value to an ASCII number. The number to be converted must be numeric and greater than or equal to zero. The PROC will return TRUE or FALSE to indicate whether or not the conversion was successful. An overflow condition results in a return of FALSE. Syntax: := INTEGER^ASCII( , , ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE (-1) if the conversion was successful; otherwise, FALSE (0) is returned.

, STRING:ref,

contains the converted, variable length numeric text.

NOTE: It is up to the user to declare long enough to receive the converted string. , INT,

contains the length of the string array.

, INT,

contains the INT number to be converted.

example: STRING INT

.txt^str[ 0:2 ]; txt^lgth, val;

txt^lgth := 3; val := 12; IF INTEGER^ASCII( txt^str, txt^lgth, val ) THEN ! successful ELSE ! error

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Format Conversion Procs INTEGER^ASCIIX (extended address version)

INTEGER^ASCIIX (extended address version) Converts an INT value to an ASCII number. The number to be converted must be numeric and greater than or equal to zero. The PROC will return TRUE or FALSE to indicate whether or not the conversion was successful. An overflow condition results in a return of FALSE. Syntax: := INTEGER^ASCIIX( , , ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE (-1) if the conversion was successful; otherwise, FALSE (0) is returned.

, STRING.EXT:ref,

contains the converted, variable length numeric text.

NOTE: It is up to the user to declare long enough to receive the converted string. , INT,

contains the length of the string array.

, INT,

contains the INT number to be converted.

example: STRING INT

.ext txt^strx[ 0:2 ]; txt^lgth, val;

txt^lgth := 3; val := 12; IF INTEGER^ASCIIX( txt^strx, txt^lgth, val ) THEN ! successful ELSE ! error

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Format Conversion Procs INTEGER^HEXCHAR

INTEGER^HEXCHAR Converts an integer value (0-15) into its hex character equivalent ("0"-"F"). If the integer to be converted is invalid, the PROC returns FALSE. Syntax: := INTEGER^HEXCHAR( , ) where: , INT,

returns FALSE (0) if the integer value is invalid and returns TRUE (-1) if the conversion is successful.

, STRING:ref,

contains the result of the conversion from an integer value to its hex character equivalent.

, INT:val,

is the integer value to be converted to its hex character equivalent.

example: INT

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STRING

stat, intval; hexval;

intval stat

:= 15; := INTEGER^HEXCHAR( hexval, intval );

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Format Conversion Procs SET^PARITY

SET^PARITY Sets the parity (leftmost) bit on each character in the supplied buffer so that overall character parity becomes even or odd as requested. Note that none of the parameters has its value changed; only the supplied buffer is modified. Syntax: CALL SET^PARITY( eptr, lgth, even ); where: , STRING.EXT;ref,

is an extended string address pointer to the caller's buffer

, INT:val,

is the effective length of the caller's buffer in bytes

, INT:val,

contains the type of parity requested: -1 = TRUE, for even parity 0 = FALSE, for odd parity

example: INT

lgth := 120, even := -1, not^even := 0; STRING .buf^s[ 0:lgth -1 ], .ext eptr; @eptr

! true

:= $XADR( buf^s );

! sets even parity CALL SET^PARITY( eptr, lgth, even ); ! sets odd parity CALL SET^PARITY( eptr, lgth, not^even );

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Format Conversion Procs TRANSLATE

TRANSLATE Used to translate a string from one character set to another: 1) ASCII to EBCDIC, 2) EBCDIC to ASCII, 3) ASCII to DATAPRODUCTS 2230 line printer subset. Syntax: CALL TRANSLATE( , , ) where: , STRING:ref,

initially contains the variable length string to be translated. After execution of the PROC, contains the translated string.

, INT,

contains the length of the string array.

, INT,

contains the type of translation requested: 0 = ASCII to EBCDIC 1 = EBCDIC to ASCII 2 = ASCII to Dataproducts 2230 line printer subset

example: LITERAL STRING INT

ascii^to^ebcdic^l .txt^str[ 0:15 ]; lgth, translate^typ;

= 0;

txt^str := "translate text"; lgth := 14; translate^typ := ascii^to^ebcdic^l; CALL TRANSLATE( txt^str, lgth, translate^typ );

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Format Conversion Procs TRANSLATEX (extended address version)

TRANSLATEX (extended address version) Used to translate a string from one character set to another: 1) ASCII to EBCDIC, 2) EBCDIC to ASCII, 3) ASCII to DATAPRODUCTS 2230 line printer subset. Syntax: CALL TRANSLATEX( , , ) where: , STRING.EXT:ref,

initially contains the variable length string to be translated. After execution of the PROC, contains the translated string.

, INT,

contains the length of the string array.

, INT,

contains the type of translation requested: 0 = ASCII to EBCDIC 1 = EBCDIC to ASCII 2 = ASCII to Dataproducts 2230 line printer subset

example: LITERAL ascii^to^ebcdic^l STRING .ext txt^strx[ 0:15 ]; INT lgth, translate^typ;

= 0;

txt^strx := "translate text"; lgth := 14; translate^typ := ascii^to^ebcdic^l; CALL TRANSLATEX( txt^strx, lgth, translate^typ );

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Format Conversion Procs ZDNUMIN

ZDNUMIN Converts an ASCII string to a signed double word. It performs the same function as Tandem's NUMIN procedure except that the ASCII number is converted to an INT(32) instead of an integer. Syntax: := ZDNUMIN( , , , ) where: , INT,

contains the byte address of the first character in the string that wasn't useful in the conversion.

, STRING:ref,

contains the ASCII number to be converted.

, INT(32):ref,

contains the converted number in binary.

, INT,

is the number base for the resulting conversion. Valid numbers are 2 through 10.

, INT:ref,

returns the status of the conversion: -1 string does not start with "+", "-", or "%" 0 good number 1 overflow or illegal value

example: STRING INT

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INT(32)

.ascii^num[ 0:2 ]; .addr, base, stat; dnum;

ascii^num base @addr

':=' "123"; := 10; := ZDNUMIN( ascii^num, dnum, base, stat );

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Format Conversion Procs ZDNUMOUT

ZDNUMOUT Converts a signed double word to an ASCII string. It performs the same function as Tandem's NUMOUT procedure except that an INT(32) number is converted to an ASCII string. Syntax: := ZDNUMOUT( , , , ) where: , INT,

contains the byte address of the first character in the string that wasn't useful in the conversion.

, STRING:ref,

contains the converted ASCII number.

, INT(32),

contains the number in binary to be converted.

, INT,

is the number base for the resulting conversion. Valid numbers are 2 through 10.

, INT,

if present, will put the result in the buffer right justified. If not present, the result will be put in the buffer left justified.

example: STRING INT INT(32)

.ascii^num[ 0:3 ]; .addr, base, width; dnum;

dnum base width @addr

:= 123d; := 10; := 4; := ZDNUMOUT( ascii^num, dnum, base, width );

result: ascii^num = " 123"

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Format Conversion Procs ZNUMOUT

ZNUMOUT Converts an unsigned integer value to its ASCII equivalent. If the width is passed then the result is right justified. Otherwise it returned left justified. Syntax: := ZNUMOUT( , , , ) where: , INT,

contains the address of the next available byte in the buffer.

, STRING:ref,

contains the converted number.

, INT,

contains the integer to be converted.

, INT,

is the number base for the resulting conversion. Valid numbers are 2 through 10.

, INT,

if present, will put the result in the buffer right justified. If not present, the result will be put in the buffer left justified.

example: STRING INT

.ascii^num[ 0:3 ]; .addr, num, base, width;

num base width @addr

:= 123 := 10; := 4; := ZNUMOUT( ascii^num, num, base, width );

result: ascii^num = " 123"

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Format Conversion Procs ZNUMOUT

ACI Worldwide Inc.

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Section 10 Manipulation String Manipulation CONVERT^FIELD^JUSTIFICATION Converts a field that is right justified, zero filled on the left to a field that is left justified, blank filled on the right and vice versa. Syntax: CALL CONVERT^FIELD^JUSTIFICATION( , , , , ); where: , STRING:ref,

contains the right justified, zero filled text.

, INT:value,

contains the length of .

, STRING:ref,

contains the left justified, blank filled text.

, INT:value,

contains the length of .

, INT:value,

indicates the type of conversion to perform: 0 = convert a right justified, zero filled field to a left justified, blank filled field. 1 = convert a left justified, blank filled field to a right justified, zero filled field.

example: LITERAL

right^to^left^l left^to^right^l

STRING

.rt^field[ 0:10 ], .lf^field[ 0:10 ];

= 0, = 1;

rt^field ':=' "0000justify"; CALL convert^field^justification( rt^field, 11,lf^field, 11, right^to^left^l ); Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

10-1

Manipulation CONVERT^STATE^CODE

CONVERT^STATE^CODE Converts a two digit state code to a two letter state code and back. The state table built is based on fips processing standards publication 6-3. Syntax: := CONVERT^STATE^CODE( , , ) where: , INT,

contains TRUE(-1) if the conversion was successful. Otherwise, FALSE (0).

, STRING:ref,

contains a two digit representation of a state code (i.e. "01" for "AL", "02" for "AK" etc. ).

, STRING:ref,

contains a two letter representation for the state.

, INT,

contains the direction for the conversion to work. 1 convert from number to letter code 0 convert from letter code to number

example: LITERAL

num^to^letter^cde^l letter^to^num^cde^l

= 1, = 0;

STRING .ext scde[ 0:1 ], .ext alpha[ 0:1 ]; scde ':=' "02"; CALL CONVERT^STATE^CODE( scde, alpha, num^to^letter^cde^l );

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Manipulation DELETE^EXTRA^BLANKS

DELETE^EXTRA^BLANKS Removes extra blanks from a string buffer. 'Extra blanks' are defined as leading blanks, trailing blanks, or any occurrence of two or more consecutive blanks (which are reduced to one blank). Blanks which occur within quotes are not affected (quotes within a string are denoted by two consecutive quotation marks). Syntax: CALL DELETE^EXTRA^BLANKS( , ) where: , STRING:ref,

contains the string to be modified and the results of the conversion.

, INT:ref,

contains the number of bytes in the old string buffer and the number of bytes in the new buffer.

example: STRING INT

.str[ 0:21 ]; lgth;

lgth := 22; str ':=' " 123 "" ab ""hello"; CALL DELETE^EXTRA^BLANKS( str, lgth ); result: str lgth

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= "123 " ab "hello" = 17

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Manipulation FIELD^FINDER

FIELD^FINDER Given a string of data and an offset from the data string where the search is to begin, returns the pointer to a data string containing either alpha or numeric data. The search starting position is the first byte at or after the offset position which contains alpha or numeric data. The search is discontinued when a data type other than that specified in the search starting position is encountered. The string array to be searched must be terminated by a null value. Syntax: := FIELD^FINDER( , , ) where:

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, STRING,

contains the address of the search starting position. If does not contain either alpha or numeric data at or after the offset position, then contains a zero.

, STRING:ref,

pointer to the data string to be searched. This string must be delimited (ended) by a null value.

, INT:ref,

contains the data type of the returned string. The data type is determined by the data type in the search starting position. A "0" is returned when does not contain either alpha or numeric data at or after the offset position. 0 - non-alpha/non-numeric data 1 - numeric data (0-9) 2 - alpha data (a-z/A-Z)

, INT:ref,

on entry, contains the offset from the data string where search is to begin. Offset 0 is the beginning of the string. Upon return, it contains the length of the "found" data string. A -1 is returned when does not contain either alpha or numeric data at or after the offset position.

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Manipulation FIELD^FINDER example: STRING INT

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.str^addr, .txt[ 0:10 ]; typ, lgth;

txt lgth @str^addr

':='[ "hello 123",0 ]; := 1; := FIELD^FINDER( txt, typ, lgth );

result:

@str^addr = 1 (points to the "e" of "hello") txt = "hello 123" lgth = 4 typ =2

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Manipulation FIND^STRING

FIND^STRING Scans a string array for the occurrence of a specified string. FIND^STRING returns zero if the search string was not found. If found, FIND^STRING returns the address of the occurrence. Syntax: := FIND^STRING( , , ) where: , INT,

contains the address of the "found" string. If the search string was not found, contains 0.

NOTE: DO NOT USE INDIRECT ADDRESSING. UNPREDICTABLE RESULTS MIGHT OCCUR...

10-6

, STRING:ref,

is the array which is to be scanned for . It must be terminated by a byte containing binary zeros.

, STRING:ref,

is the array containing the subject of the search.

, INT:ref,

on entry to the PROC, must contain the length of . Upon return, this field will contain -1 if the search string was not found. Otherwise, it contains the offset from the beginning of at which the string was found.

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Manipulation FIND^STRING example: STRING INT

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

.scan^array[ 0:20 ], .search^str[ 0:1 ]; found, ofst^flg;

scan^array search^str ofst^flg found

':='["this is my day ",0]; ':=' "my"; := 2; := FIND^STRING( scan^array, search^str, ofst^flg );

result:

found points to the "m" of "my" ofst^flg = 8

10-7

Manipulation FORMAT^DECIMAL

FORMAT^DECIMAL Places a decimal point in the input string given the number of decimal places. If a decimal point already exists, the string is padded or truncated to that many decimal places. Returns FALSE (0) if non- numeric data was entered. For example, if the input string contains "12335" and the number of decimal places requested is 4, the result would be "1.2335", but if the string was "123.35" the result becomes "123.3500". Syntax: := FORMAT^DECIMAL( , , , , ) where: , INT,

return FALSE (0) if non-numeric input was entered.

, STRING:ref,

input string to be edited.

, INT,

length in bytes of input string. Length can be up to 131 bytes.

, STRING:ref:

edited string containing decimal point with number of input decimal places.

NOTE: It is up to the user to declare long enough to receive the converted string.

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, INT,

maximum length in bytes the output string can contain.

, INT,

number of decimal places the output string is to contain.

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Manipulation FORMAT^DECIMAL example: STRING INT

.input^str[ 0:7 ], .output^str[ 0:9 ]; input^lgth, output^lgth, num^dec^places;

input^str ':=' "12345678"; input^lgth := 8; output^lgth := 10; num^dec^places := 4; IF FORMAT^DECIMAL( input^str, input^lgth, output^str, output^lgth, num^dec^places ) THEN ! valid string ELSE ! error occurred

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10-9

Manipulation LEFT^JUSTIFY

LEFT^JUSTIFY Moves a string array to the left. Blanks are suppressed and inserted at the right. For example: the string array: " contents" becomes: "contents " Syntax: CALL LEFT^JUSTIFY( , ) where: , STRING:ref,

contains the input string array.

, INT,

length of input string in bytes. Allows for string length to 131 characters.

example: STRING INT

.str^array[ 0:9 ]; str^lgth;

str^lgth := 10; str^array ':=' " 12354"; CALL LEFT^JUSTIFY( str^array, str^lgth );

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Manipulation MOD10^ADD

MOD10^ADD Used to perform mod-10 addition on two buffers which contain ASCII- numeric data. The two buffers are right-aligned and added mod-10, digit by digit. Syntax: := MOD10^ADD( , , , , ); where: , INT,

returns TRUE if input data was valid ASCIInumeric data and is at most 16 bytes long; otherwise, zero-fills result and returns FALSE.

, STRING:ref,

is a buffer containing ASCII-numerics.

, STRING:ref,

is a buffer containing ASCII-numerics.

, INT:val,

is the number of bytes in to add.

, INT:val,

is the number of bytes in to add.

, STRING:ref,

is the buffer to store ASCII-numeric result of plus .

NOTE: Neither buffer may exceed 16 bytes. Also, note that the result will be digits, where equals $max( , ). example: STRING .num1[ 0:15 ] := "56928", .num2[ 0:15 ] := "01234", .result[ 0:15 ]; INT num1^lgth := 5, num2^lgth := 5; CALL MOD10^ADD( num1, num2, num1^lgth, num2^lgth, result); result: result = "57152"

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10-11

Manipulation MOD10^ADDX (extended address version)

MOD10^ADDX (extended address version) Used to perform mod-10 addition on two buffers which contain ASCII- numeric data. The two buffers are right-aligned and added mod-10, digit by digit. Syntax: := MOD10^ADDX( , , , , ); where: , INT,

returns TRUE if input data was valid ASCIInumeric data and is at most 16 bytes long; otherwise, zero-fills result and returns FALSE.

, STRING:ref,

is a buffer containing ASCII-numerics.

, STRING:ref,

is a buffer containing ASCII-numerics.

, INT:val,

is the number of bytes in to add.

, INT:val,

is the number of bytes in to add.

, STRING:ref,

is the buffer to store ASCII-numeric result of plus .

NOTE: Neither buffer may exceed 16 bytes. Also, note that the result will be digits, where equals $max( , ). example: STRING .ext num1x[ 0:15 ] := "56928", .ext num2x[ 0:15 ] := "1234", .ext resultx[ 0:15 ]; INT num1^lgth := 5, num2^lgth := 4; CALL MOD10^ADDX(num1x, num2x, num1^lgth, num2^lgth,resultx); result: resultx = "57152"

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Manipulation MOD10^SUBTRACT

MOD10^SUBTRACT Used to perform mod-10 subtraction on two buffers which contain ASCII numeric data. The two buffers are right-aligned and subtracted mod-10, digit by digit. Syntax: := MOD10^SUBTRACT( , , , , ); where: , INT,

returns TRUE if input data was valid ASCIInumeric data and is at most 16 bytes long; otherwise, zero-fills result and returns FALSE.

, STRING:ref,

is a buffer containing ASCII-numerics.

, STRING:ref,

is a buffer containing ASCII-numerics.

, INT:val,

is the number of bytes in to subtract.

, INT:val,

is the number of bytes in to subtract.

, STRING:ref,

is the buffer to store ASCII-numeric result of minus .

NOTE: Neither buffer may exceed 16 bytes. Also note that the result will be digits, where equals $max( num1^lgth, num2^lgth ). example: STRING .num1[ 0:15 ] := "56928", .num2[ 0:15 ] := "1234", .result[ 0:15 ]; INT num1^lgth := 5, num2^lgth := 4; CALL MOD10^SUBTRACT( num1, num2, num1^lgth, num2^lgth, result ); result: result = "55794"

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10-13

Manipulation MOD10^SUBTRACTX (extended address version)

MOD10^SUBTRACTX (extended address version) Used to perform mod-10 subtraction on two buffers which contain ASCII- numeric data. The two buffers are right-aligned and subtracted mod-10, digit by digit. Syntax: := MOD10^SUBTRACTX( , , , , ); where: , INT,

returns TRUE if input data was valid ASCIInumeric data and is at most 16 bytes long; otherwise, zero-fills result and returns FALSE.

, STRING.EXT:ref,

is a buffer containing ASCII-numerics.

, STRING.EXT:ref,

is a buffer containing ASCII-numerics.

, INT:val,

is the number of bytes in to subtract.

, INT:val,

is the number of bytes in to subtract.

, STRING.EXT:ref,

is the buffer to store ASCII-numeric result of minus .

NOTE: Neither buffer may exceed 16 bytes. Also note that the result will be digits, where equals $max( num1^lgth, num2^lgth ). example: STRING .ext num1x[ 0:15 ] := "56928", .ext num2x[ 0:15 ] := "1234", .ext resultx[ 0:15 ]; INT num1^lgth := 5, num2^lgth := 4; CALL MOD10^SUBTRACTX( num1x, num2x, num1^lgth, num2^lgth, resultx ); result: result = "55794"

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Manipulation PACK

PACK Packs one string into another using the following packing algorithm: - is the ASCII sub character (%h1A) - the character packed - specifies the number of consecutive 's replaced by the pack sequence. It is related to the actual character count by: := - 3 + "@" ("@" = %h40). Syntax: := PACK( , , , , ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE (non^zero) if successful, otherwise FALSE (0) is returned.

, STRING:ref,

contains the text to be packed.

, INT,

is the length to be packed in bytes. Length must be at least the length of + 1.

, STRING:ref:,

contains the packed string. Length must be as long as .

, INT:ref,

is the length of the packed string.

, INT,

is s maximum size in bytes.

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10-15

Manipulation PACK example: STRING INT

.in^buf[ 0:9 ], .out^buf[ 0:19 ]; in^lgth, out^lgth, max^lgth;

in^lgth := 11; max^lgth := 20; IF PACK( in^buf, in^lgth, out^buf,out^lgth, max^lgth ) THEN ! successful pack ELSE ! error condition

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Manipulation REMOVE^BLANKS

REMOVE^BLANKS Removes blanks from a string array and left justifies the characters in the process. For example: " my data " becomes "mydata

"

Syntax: CALL REMOVE^BLANKS( , ) where: , STRING:ref,

contains the input string array. Will contain the edited string at return.

, INT,

length of input string in bytes. Allows for string length up to 131 characters.

example: STRING INT

.str^array[ 0:9 ]; str^lgth;

str^array ':=' " my data"; str^lgth := 10; CALL REMOVE^BLANKS( str^array, str^lgth );

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10-17

Manipulation REMOVE^NON^NUMERIC

REMOVE^NON^NUMERIC Removes non-numerics from a string array. For example: the character string "abc12cd34" becomes "1234

"

Syntax: CALL REMOVE^NON^NUMERIC( , ) where: , STRING:ref,

contains the input string array.

, INT:ref,

length of input string in bytes. Allows for string length to 131 characters. On return, contains thenumber of numeric characters in .

example: STRING INT

.str^array[ 0:9 ]; str^lgth;

str^array ':=' "123 my 890"; str^lgth := 10; CALL REMOVE^NON^NUMERIC( str^array, str^lgth );

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Manipulation RIGHT^JUSTIFY

RIGHT^JUSTIFY Moves a string array to the right. Only rightmost blanks are sup-pressed and inserted at the left. For example: the character string "123 abc " becomes " 123 abc" Syntax: CALL RIGHT^JUSTIFY( , ) where: , STRING:ref,

contains the input string array.

, INT,

length of input string in bytes. Allows for string length to 131 characters.

example: STRING INT

.str^array[ 0:9 ]; str^lgth;

str^array ':=' "123abc "; str^lgth := 10; CALL RIGHT^JUSTIFY( str^array, str^lgth );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

10-19

Manipulation STRLEN

STRLEN Computes and returns the length of an input string. The string must be terminated by a null delimiter at the end, and any trailing blanks (preceding the null) will be ignored. Syntax: := STRLEN( , ) where: , INT:ref,

contains the length of the string.

, INT:ref,

contains the string whose length is desired.

, INT, optional,

if passed, contains the maximum length of the string.

example:

10-20

STRING INT

.str^blk[ 0:9 ]; lgth, max^lgth;

str^blk max^lgth lgth

':=' "hello " & [ 0 ]; := 10; := STRLEN( string, max^lgth );

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Manipulation STRLENX (extended address version)

STRLENX (extended address version) Computes and returns the length of an input string. The string must be terminated by a null delimiter at the end, and any trailing blanks (preceding the null) will be ignored. Syntax: := STRLENX( , ) where: , INT:ref,

contains the length of the string.

, INT:ref,

contains the string whose length is desired.

, INT, optional,

if passed, contains the maximum length of the string.

example: STRING .ext strx[ 0:9 ]; INT max^lgth, lgth; strx max^lgth lgth

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

':=' "hello " & [ 0 ]; := 10; := STRLENX( strx, max^lgth );

10-21

Manipulation SYM^NAME^LEN

SYM^NAME^LEN Determines the length of a symbolic name, without the trailing blanks. A symbolic name can contain Alpha Numberic Characters plus ‘^’ and ‘-‘ Syntax: := SYM^NAME^LEN( ) where: , INT,

contains the length of the symbolic name (0-16).

, STRING.EXT:ref, contains the symbolic name up to 16 bytes example: INT STRING

lgth; .sym^name[0:15]

sym^name ‘:=’”PROC-NAME^LEN.?*”; lgth :=SYM^NAME^LEN(sym^name); results:

10-22

lgth will be 13 after this call.

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Manipulation UNPACK

UNPACK Unpacks one string into another using the following packing algorithm: - is the ASCII sub character (%h1A) - the character packed - specifies the number of consecutive 's replaced by the pack sequence. It is related to the actual character count by: := - 3 + "@". ("@" = %h40) Syntax: := UNPACK( , , , , ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE (non^zero) if successful.

, STRING:ref,

contains the text to be unpacked.

, INT,

is the length to be unpacked in bytes. Length must be at least 1 less than the length of .

, STRING:ref,

contains the unpacked string.

, INT:ref,

is the length of the unpacked string.

, INT,

is s maximum size in bytes.

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10-23

Manipulation UNPACK example: STRING INT

.in^buf[ 0:9 ], .out^buf[ 0:19 ]; in^lgth, out^lgth, max^lgth;

in^lgth := 11; max^lgth := 20; IF UNPACK( in^buf, in^lgth, out^buf,out^lgth, max^lgth ) THEN ! successful ELSE ! error condition

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Manipulation VALID^DECIMAL^NUMBER

VALID^DECIMAL^NUMBER Checks for a valid decimal number and returns an index to the decimal point if it exists (e.g., if the input string contains "1234.789", the index would be returned as 4). Returns TRUE (-1) if the input string is a valid decimal number. Syntax: := VALID^DECIMAL^NUMBER( , , ) where: , INT,

returns TRUE (non-zero) if this is a valid decimal number.

, STRING:ref,

contains the input string array.

, INT,

length of input string in bytes.

, INT,

if present, contains an index to the decimal point if there is one. -1 is returned if this is a valid decimal number but contains no decimal points.

example: STRING INT

.str^array[ 0:9 ]; str^lgth, decimal^index;

str^array ':=' "1234567.00"; str^lgth := 10; IF VALID^DECIMAL^NUMBER( str^array, str^lgth, decimal^index )THEN ! valid decimal number ELSE ! invalid decimal number

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

10-25

Manipulation ZERO^SUPPRESS

ZERO^SUPPRESS Replaces leading zeros with blanks. For example: the character string "00001234.69" becomes "

1234.69"

Syntax: CALL ZERO^SUPPRESS( , ) where: , STRING:ref,

contains the input string array.

, INT,

length of input string in bytes.

example: STRING INT

.str^array[ 0:9 ]; str^lgth;

str^array ':=' "0000123.49"; str^lgth := 10; CALL ZERO^SUPPRESS( str^array, str^lgth );

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Manipulation ZERO^SUPPRESS

Data Manipulation These procedures allow you to work with memory above 32K. They have two major functions, to compare one area of memory to another, or to move one area of memory to another. To simplify the use of these PROCs when using structs, source in the file $.ACIUTILS.UTILDEFS( DCF^DEFINES ). This file contains a series of DEFINEs as described on the following page. These require copystruct and comparestruct sections from $.ACIUTILS.UTILEXTS Examples are given using the following struct definitions: STRUCT my^crd; BEGIN STRUCT mynam; BEGIN STRING bytes[ 0:29 ]; END; INT crd^id; STRING ssn[ 0:8 ]; END; STRUCT emp^crd; BEGIN STRUCT emp^nam; BEGIN STRING bytes[ 0:29 ]; END; INT comp^id; INT(32) emp^date; STRING ssn[ 0:8 ]; STRUCT address; BEGIN STRING bytes[ 0:20 ]; END; END;

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10-27

Manipulation DEFINEs

DEFINEs NOTE: The parameters and , represent the base address of the struct, while and are the data items byte offset. CFIELDLITNU( lit, litlen, to, field ) - moves a literal to a field within a struct. No upshifting is done. Example: CFIELDLITNU( "JOHN DOE", 8, mycrd, mynam ) CFIELDLIT( lit, litlen, to, field ) - upshifts the literal and moves it to a field in a struct. CFIELDLIT1( lit, litlen, to, field, fill ) - moves a literal to a field and pads with fill character. Example: CFIELDLIT1( "JOHN DOE", 8, mycrd, mynam, " " ) CFIELDNU( from, to, field ) - moves one like field to another. No upshifting is done. Example: CFIELDNU( mycrd, emp^crd, ssn ) CFIELD( from, to, field ) - upshifts the field to be moved and moves it to a like field. COMPFIELDNU( from, to, field ) - compares two like fields and returns TRUE if equal. Does not upshift to do the compare. Example: IF COMPFIELDNU( mycrd, emp^crd, ssn ) THEN ... ELSE ... COMPFIELD( from, to , field ) - compares two like fields in uppercase. CSTRUCTNU( from, fromfield, to, tofield ) - copies one data area to another. Does not upshift. Example: CSTRUCTNU( mycrd, mynam, emp^crd, emp^nam )

CSTRUCT( from, fromfield, to, tofield ) - upshifts the field to be moved and then moves it to another data area. 10-28

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Manipulation DEFINEs COMPSTRUCTNU( from, fromfield, to, tofield ) - compares one data area to another. Returns TRUE if they are equal. Does not upshift to do the compare. Example: IF COMPSTRUCTNU( mycrd, mynam, emp^crd, emp^nam ) THEN ... !equal condition ELSE ... COMPSTRUCT( from, fromfield, to, tofield ) - compares one data area to another in uppercase.

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10-29

Manipulation UPSHIFT^FIELD

UPSHIFT^FIELD Used to upshift an area in memory. Syntax: CALL UPSHIFT^FIELD( , , ) where: , INT:ref,

is the word address of the area to be upshifted.

, INT,

contains the number of bytes from to the data item being upshifted.

, INT,

number of bytes the data item contains. Length must be > 0 and less than 4096.

example: INT

.fld[ 0:9 ], ofst, fld^lgth;

ofst := 0; fld^lgth := 20; CALL UPSHIFT^FIELD( @fld, ofst, fld^lgth ); NOTE: This procedure does not upshift for if a field terminator is contained in the area to be upshifted. Commas and possibly other such characters will stop this procedure. Example: abcd,ef becomes ABCD It is recommended that the NSK call to the SHIFTSTRING procedure be used INSTEAD of upshift^field.

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Section 11 Timer Routines Overview There are two sets of timer routines that provide an easy method of working with interval timers. The User Data Segment Timer Routines work on timers allocated in the User Data Segment (the lower and upper 64K bytes of global memory). The Extended Memory Segment Timer Routines take advantage of extended memory segments. Due to the memory space available in Extended Memory, these routines support substantially more timers. Over six million timers could be supported in one extended memory segment, however using large numbers of timers may produce performance burdens on the system. There is a significant difference in the timestamp used by each set of timer routines. The NSK system supports a proprietary 48-bit timestamp, and a 64-bit Julian Timestamp. The User Data Segment Timer Routines utilize the 48-bit timestamp, while the Extended Memory Segment Timer Routines use the Julian Timestamp. The NSK system changes the 48-bit timestamp value during Daylight Savings Time. The Julian Timestamp is not altered for Daylight Savings Time. Consequently, the User Data Segment Timers are affected by the Daylight Savings Time change, whereas the Extended Memory Segment Timer Routines are not. These two sets are not interchangeable.

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

11-1

Timer Routines User Data Segment Timer Routines

User Data Segment Timer Routines The procedures DELETE^THIS^TIMER, FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMER, NEXT^EXPIRE^TIME, TIMER^DELETE, TIMER^DELETE^1, TIMER^EXPIRED, TIMER^INIT, and TIMER^INSERT are used when the timer data structures reside within the data area of the User Data Segment. This includes the global memory in the 64K byte Data Stack, and the upper 64K bytes of global memory. The structures for the User Data Segment Timer Routines are defined as follows: STRUCT BEGIN INT FIXED INT INT INT INT STRING END; STRUCT BEGIN INT

timer^def( * ); next; exptime; et[ 0:3 ] = exptime; typ; subtyp; userbuf; s^userbuf = userbuf; timer^control^block^def( * ); first^timer^addr, free^timer^addr, num^of^timers, timer^depth, max^timer^depth;

END; The userbuf element of the timer^def structure locates a word address at the end of each timer where user data can be placed. When timers are initialized, the word size of the largest user data area is specified so that the timers are allocated in memory with space at the end of each timer for a data structure of the developer’s choice. The address of a particular timer is returned by each of the following procs: FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMER, TIMER^EXPIRED, and TIMER^INSERT. This address can be used to locate the beginning of the userdata areas for application specific purposes. The user should modify no other area of the timer structure. To use these procs do the following: 1) Source in =ACIUTILS_UTILDEFS( timer^structs ) in your program where struct templates are defined. 2) Declare timer control block (using TIMER^CONTROL^BLOCK^DEF). 11-2

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Timer Routines User Data Segment Timer Routines 3) Declare the timer table large enough to contain the maximum number of timers, plus any user data associated with timer elements. 4) CALL TIMER^INIT before calling any other TIMER procedures. Example: LITERAL

timer^user^buf^lgth^l num^of^timers^l timer^entry^size^l timer^tbl^limit^l

= 4, ! size in words of userbuf = 100, = $len( timer^def ) / 2) + timer^user^buf^lgth^l - 1, = num^of^timers^l * timer^entry^size^l - 1;

?source =aciutils_utildefs( timer^structs ) STRUCT INT

tcb( timer^control^block^def ); . timer^tbl[ 0:timer^tbl^limit ];

?source =aciutils_utilexts( timer^init, timer^delete, ... ) PROC main^proc MAIN; BEGIN LITERAL req^timer^l saf^timer^l wft^timer^l fetimedout INT error, file, .timer( timer^def ); INT(32) timer^wait;

= 0, = 1, = 2, = 40;

CALL timer^init( tcb, timer^tbl, num^of^timers^l, timer^user^buf^lgth^l ); CALL timer^insert( tcb, 100d, saf^timer^l ); CALL timer^insert( tcb, 55d, wft^timer^l ); CALL timer^insert( tcb, 300d, req^timer^l ); file timer^wait

:= -1; := next^expire^time( tcb );

CALL awaitio( file , , , , timer^wait ); IF THEN BEGIN CALL fileinfo( file, error ); IF error = fetimedout THEN BEGIN @timer := timer^expired( tcb, true ); WHILE @timer 0 DO Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

11-3

Timer Routines User Data Segment Timer Routines BEGIN CALL process^timeout( timer ); @timer := timer^expired( tcb, true ); END; END ELSE ! handle file error, other than timeout … END ELSE ! handle normal i/o completion ...

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Timer Routines DELETE^THIS^TIMER

DELETE^THIS^TIMER Designed to be used after a call to timer^expired or find^specific^timer, when the location of the timer that is to be deleted is known. Syntax: := DELETE^THIS^TIMER( , ); where: , INT,

returns true if the timer was deleted, and false otherwise.

,INT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT:ref,

a pointer returned by one of the following: - find^specific^timer - timer^insert - timer^expired

example: @timer := find^specific^timer( tcb, type^1 ); IF not DELETE^THIS^TIMER( tcb, timer ) THEN BEGIN CALL log^message( timer^not^found ); END;

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

11-5

Timer Routines FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMER

FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMER Used to find the first timer (i.e., the one with the earliest expiration time), which matches the calling parameters. Syntax: := FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMER( , , , , ) where: , INT,

contains the address of the found timer. Returns FALSE(0) if no timer was found.

,INT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT,

is the type of timer to be returned. Type is an integer value specified when the timer is inserted.

, INT,

is the subtype of timer to be returned. Subtype is an integer value specified when the timer is inserted.

, INT:ref,

only timers with equal to userbuf for the length of will be returned.

, INT,

word length of the comparison between parameter and data area that must match.

This is a variable type procedure. Only is required. The rest of the parameters are optional. If no additional parameters are specified, no timer will be located. If or are specified, both are required. example: @timer := FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMER( tcb, typ, subtyp, userbuf, userbufsize );

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Timer Routines NEXT^EXPIRE^TIME

NEXT^EXPIRE^TIME Returns the time interval, in hundredths of a second, which must pass before the next timer expires. Syntax: := NEXT^EXPIRE^TIME( ) where: , INT(32),

contains 0d if a timer has already expired. If there are no timers in the timer list, -1d is returned.

The value that is returned may be passed directly as the parameter in the AWAITIO[X] procedure. , INT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

example: file := -1; wait^time := NEXT^EXPIRE^TIME( tcb ); CALL awaitio( file, , , , timer^wait );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

11-7

Timer Routines TIMER^DELETE

TIMER^DELETE Used to delete one or more timers from the timer list. Syntax: := TIMER^DELETE(, , , , ) where: , INT

contains false (0) if any of the required parameters are missing, otherwise returns true (-1).

, INT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT,

is the type of timer to be deleted. Type is an integer value specified when the timer is inserted.

, INT,

is the subtype of timer to be deleted. Subtype is an integer value specified when the timer is inserted.

, INT:ref,

only timers with equal to userbuf for the length of will be deleted.

, INT,

word length of the comparison between parameter and data area that must match.

This is a variable type procedure. Only is required. The rest of the parameters are optional. If no additional parameters are specified, no timer will be deleted. If or are specified, both are required. example: CALL TIMER^DELETE( tcb, typ, subtyp, userbuf, userbufsize );

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Timer Routines TIMER^DELETE^1

TIMER^DELETE^1 Used to delete one or more timers from the timer list and also gives the user two additional options concerning the deleted timers. The last parameter is for a user proc that allows the user to process the data in the timer and/or the user proc can specify whether to continue searching the timer table. Syntax: := TIMER^DELETE^1( , , , , , ); where: , INT,

contains true (-1) only if all the required parameters are there and if all parameters are valid.

, INT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT,

is the type of timer to be deleted. Type is an integer value specified when the timer is inserted.

, INT,

is the subtype of timer to be deleted. Subtype is an integer value specified when the timer is inserted.

, INT:ref,

only timers with equal to userbuf for the length of will be deleted.

, INT,

word length of the comparison between parameter and data area that must match.

, INT,

proc to be called with each matching timer found. Must be declared INT proc userproc( timer ); INT .timer( timer^def );

This is a variable type procedure. Only is required. The rest of the parameters are optional. If no additional parameters are specified, no timer will be deleted. Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

11-9

Timer Routines TIMER^DELETE^1 If or are specified, both are required. The should return true (-1) if the search for more timers is to continue. It can be used to perform cleanup tasks when a timer is deleted. Such tasks might include deallocating memory that was reserved by the given timer. example: CALL TIMER^DELETE^1( tcb, typ, subtyp, userbuf, userbufsize, userproc );

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Timer Routines TIMER^EXPIRED

TIMER^EXPIRED Checks if any timer has expired. Only the first timer is checked. If more than one timer has expired, TIMER^EXPIRED must be called once for each timer that has expired, until false(0) is returned. Syntax: := TIMER^EXPIRED( , ) where: , INT,

will contain the address of the timer if it expired. Otherwise, FALSE(0) is returned.

, INT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT,

is used to delete a timer that has expired. If omitted, the timer will not be deleted.

example: DO BEGIN @timer := TIMER^EXPIRED( tcb, true ); IF @timer 0 THEN BEGIN ! process expired timer END; END UNTIL @timer = 0;

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11-11

Timer Routines TIMER^INIT

TIMER^INIT Used to initialize the timer table. This proc must be called before using any of the other timer procedures. Syntax: CALL TIMER^INIT( , , , ) where: , INT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT:ref,

is the timer table declared in the globals.

, INT,

is the maximum number of timers that timer^tbl can hold.

, INT,

is the word length of the user buffer area of the timer entry. If no user buffer is needed, the value of the parameter may be 0.

The user data area of the timers does not have to match for each timer type and subtype. If multiple layouts are to be used, specify the word size of the largest user data structure. The size specified here will be allocated at the end of every timer structure to provide this user data area to each timer. example: CALL TIMER^INIT( tcb, timer^tbl, $occurs( timer^tbl ), user^buf^size );

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Timer Routines TIMER^INSERT

TIMER^INSERT Used to insert an interval timer in the active timer list. Syntax: := TIMER^INSERT( , , , ) where: , INT,

contains the address of the new timer. Returns FALSE (0) if no unused timers were available.

, INT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT (32),

is the time interval, in hundredths of a second, for the added timer.

, INT,

is the type of timer to be inserted.

, INT,

is the subtype of timer to be inserted.

example: @timer := TIMER^INSERT( tcb, delay^time, typ, subtyp ); timer.userbuf := some^value; OR @user^area := @timer.userbuf; ! manipulate user^area structure

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

11-13

Timer Routines Extended Memory Segment Timer Routines

Extended Memory Segment Timer Routines The procedures DELETE^THIS^TIMERX, FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMERX, NEXT^EXPIRE^TIMEX, TIMER^ALLOCATEX, TIMER^DELETEX, TIMER^EXPIREDX, TIMER^INITX, and TIMER^INSERTX are used when the timer data structures reside with an extended memory segment. It doesn’t matter whether it is a selectable segment or a flat segment. The structures for the Extended Memory Segment Timer Routines are defined as follows: STRUCT BEGIN INT(32) FIXED INT INT INT STRING END; STRUCT BEGIN INT(32) INT(32) INT(32) INT(32) INT(32) INT(32) INT(32) INT END;

timerx^def( * ); next; exptime; type; subtype; userbuf;

! address of next timer in the list ! expiration timestamp ! user defined timer type ! user defined timer subtype ! first word of variable length ! user buffer s^userbuf = userbuf; ! string userbuf symbol timer^control^blockx^def ( * );

first^timer^addr; free^timer^addr; number^of^timers; timer^depth; max^timer^depth; number^allocated; alloc^block^size; timer^size;

The userbuf element of the timerx^def structure locates a word address at the end of each timer where user data can be placed. When timers are initialized, the word size of the largest user data area is specified so that the timers are allocated in memory with space at the end of each timer for a data structure of the developer’s choice. The address of a particular timer is returned by each of the following procs: FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMERX, TIMER^EXPIREDX, and TIMER^INSERTX. This address can be used to locate the beginning of the userdata areas for application specific purposes. The user should modify no other area of the timer structure.

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Timer Routines Extended Memory Segment Timer Routines To use these procs do the following: 1) Source in =ACIUTILS_UTILDEFS( timer^structs ) in your program where struct templates are defined. 2) Declare timer control block (using TIMER^CONTROL^BLOCKX^DEF). 3) Declare the timer table large enough to contain the maximum number of timers, plus any user data associated with timer elements. This timer table should be allocated in an extended memory segment. 4) CALL TIMER^INITX before calling any other TIMER procedures. Example: LITERAL

timer^user^buf^lgth^l num^of^timers^l timer^entry^size^l timer^tbl^limit^l

= 4, ! size in words of userbuf = 100, = $len( timerx^def ) / 2) + timer^user^buf^lgth^l - 1, = num^of^timers^l * timer^entry^size^l - 1;

?source =aciutils_utildefs( timer^structs ) STRUCT INT

.ext tcb( timer^control^blockx^def ); .ext timer^tbl;

?source =aciutils_utilexts( timer^deletex, timer^insertx, timer^initx, ... ) PROC main^proc MAIN; BEGIN LITERAL req^timer^l = 0, saf^timer^l = 1, wft^timer^l = 2, fetimedout = 40; INT error, file, .ext timer( timerx^def ); INT(32) timer^wait; ! allocate extended memory segment and ! assign tcb & timer^tbl appropriate addresses @tcb := base_addr; @timer^tbl := base_addr + $len( tcb ); CALL timer^initx( tcb, timer^tbl, num^of^timers^l, timer^user^buf^lgth^l ); CALL timer^insertx( tcb, 100d, saf^timer^l ); CALL timer^insertx( tcb, 55d, wft^timer^l ); CALL timer^insertx( tcb, 300d, req^timer^l ); file

:= -1;

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11-15

Timer Routines Extended Memory Segment Timer Routines timer^wait

:= next^expire^timex( tcb );

CALL awaitio( file , , , , timer^wait ); IF THEN BEGIN CALL fileinfo( file, error ); IF error = fetimedout THEN BEGIN @timer := timer^expiredx( tcb, true ); WHILE @timer 0 DO BEGIN CALL process^timeout( timer ); @timer := timer^expiredx( tcb, true ); END; END ELSE ! handle file error, other than timeout … END ELSE ! handle normal i/o completion ...

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Timer Routines DELETE^THIS^TIMERX

DELETE^THIS^TIMERX Designed to be used after a call to timer^expiredx or find^specific^timerx, when the location of the timer that is to be deleted is known. Syntax: := DELETE^THIS^TIMERX( , ); where: , INT,

returns true if the timer was deleted, and false otherwise.

,INT .EXT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT .EXT:ref,

a pointer returned by one of the following: - find^specific^timerx - timer^insertx - timer^expiredx

example: @timer := find^specific^timerx( tcb, type^1 ); IF not DELETE^THIS^TIMERX( tcb, timer ) THEN BEGIN CALL log^message( timer^not^found ); END;

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

11-17

Timer Routines FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMERX

FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMERX Used to find the first timer (i.e., the one with the earliest expiration time), which matches the calling parameters. Syntax: := FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMERX( , , , , ) where: , INT(32),

contains the address of the found timer. Returns FALSE(0d) if no timer was found.

,INT .EXT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT,

is the type of timer to be returned. Type is an integer value specified when the timer is inserted.

, INT,

is the subtype of timer to be returned. Subtype is an integer value specified when the timer is inserted.

, INT .EXT:ref,

only timers with equal to userbuf for the length of will be returned.

, INT,

word length of the comparison between parameter and data area that must match.

This is an extensible type procedure. Only is required. The rest of the parameters are optional. If no additional parameters are specified, no timer will be located. If or are specified, both are required. example: @timer := FIND^SPECIFIC^TIMERX( tcb, typ, subtyp, userbuf, userbufsize );

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Timer Routines NEXT^EXPIRE^TIMEX

NEXT^EXPIRE^TIMEX Returns the time interval, in hundredths of a second, which must pass before the next timer expires. Syntax: := NEXT^EXPIRE^TIMEX( ) where: , INT(32),

contains 0d if a timer has already expired. If there are no timers in the timer list, -1d is returned.

The value that is returned may be passed directly as the parameter in the AWAITIO[X] procedure. , INT .EXT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

example: file := -1; wait^time := NEXT^EXPIRE^TIMEX( tcb ); CALL awaitio( file, , , , timer^wait );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

11-19

Timer Routines TIMER^ALLOCATEX

TIMER^ALLOCATEX Due to the larger number of timers possible using extended memory it is not required that all the timers be initialized by TIMER^INITX. If only a subset of timers are initialized by TIMER^INITX, TIMER^ALLOCATEX can be called to allocate an additional block of timers. If there are unallocated timers in the extended memory table, and there are no available allocated timers for TIMER^INSERTX to use, TIMER^INSERTX will automatically call TIMER^ALLOCATEX to build additional timers in the available timer list. Syntax: CALL TIMER^ALLOCATEX( , ) where: , INT .EXT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT(32),

is the number of timers to allocate. If omitted, the number is determined by the value specified by the param in the call to TIMER^INITX.

example: CALL TIMER^ALLOCATEX( tcb );

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Timer Routines TIMER^DELETEX

TIMER^DELETEX Used to delete one or more timers from the timer list. Provides the user the ability to pass a user defined procedure to perform additional cleanup related to the deleted timers. This extended memory timer routine combines functionality similar to TIMER^DELETE and TIMER^DELETE^1. This extended memory version treats the userproc in TIMER^DELETE^1 as an optional parameter. The userproc is only called if it is passed as an argument. Otherwise, the functionality is similar to TIMER^DELETE. Syntax: := TIMER^DELETEX( , , , , , ); where: , INT,

contains true (-1) only if all the required parameters are there and if all parameters are valid.

, INT .EXT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT,

is the type of timer to be deleted. Type is an integer value specified when the timer is inserted.

, INT,

is the subtype of timer to be deleted. Subtype is an integer value specified when the timer is inserted.

, INT .EXT:ref,

only timers with equal to userbuf for the length of will be deleted.

, INT,

word length of the comparison between parameter and data area that must match.

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

11-21

Timer Routines TIMER^DELETEX , INT,

proc to be called with each matching timer found. Must be declared INT proc userproc( timer ); INT .ext timer( timerx^def );

This is an extensible type procedure. Only is required. The rest of the parameters are optional. If no additional parameters are specified, no timer will be deleted. If or are specified, both are required. The should return true (-1) if the search for more timers is to continue. It can be used to perform cleanup tasks when a timer is deleted. Such tasks might include deallocating memory that was reserved for the given timer. example: CALL TIMER^DELETEX( tcb, typ, subtyp, userbuf, userbufsize, userproc );

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Timer Routines TIMER^EXPIREDX

TIMER^EXPIREDX Checks if any timer has expired. Only the first timer is checked. If more than one timer has expired, TIMER^EXPIREDX must be called once for each timer that has expired, until false (0) is returned. Syntax: := TIMER^EXPIREDX( , ) where: , INT(32),

will contain the address of the timer if it expired. Otherwise, FALSE (0) is returned.

, INT .EXT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT,

is used to delete a timer that has expired. If omitted, the timer will not be deleted.

example: DO BEGIN @timer := TIMER^EXPIREDX( tcb, true ); IF @timer 0d THEN BEGIN ! process expired timer END; END UNTIL @timer = 0d;

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

11-23

Timer Routines TIMER^INITX

TIMER^INITX Used to initialize the timer table. This proc must be called before using any of the other timer procedures. Syntax: CALL TIMER^INITX( , , , , ) where: , INT .EXT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT .EXT:ref,

is the timer table declared in extended memory.

, INT(32),

is the maximum number of timers that timer^tbl can hold.

, INT,

is the word length of the user buffer area of the timer entry. If no user buffer is needed, the value of the parameter may be 0.

, INT(32),

indicates how many timers allocate in the available timer pool initially, and with each subsequent call to TIMER^ALLOCATEX. -1d – allocate all timers 0d – allocate 1000 timers any other positive number – indicates specific number to allocate.

This call initializes the timer control block, and calls TIMER^ALLOCATEX to allocate all or a subset of the timers to create a pool of available allocated timers. This allocation doesn’t allocate memory; rather it adds timer elements to a linked list of available timers. When there are no timer elements in the linked list, TIMER^INSERTX will call TIMER^ALLOCATEX if the total number of timers allocated is less than . The is intended to provide some flexibility when the number of timers in use creates a performance issue by initializing them all up front. For the use of fewer timers, it is most likely best to specify –1d and allocate them all initially.

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Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Timer Routines TIMER^INITX The user data area of the timers does not have to match for each timer type and subtype. If multiple layouts are to be used, specify the word size of the largest user data structure. The size specified here will be allocated at the end of every timer structure to provide this user data area to each timer. example: CALL TIMER^INITX( tcb, timer^tbl, max^timers, user^buf^size, -1d );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

11-25

Timer Routines TIMER^INSERTX

TIMER^INSERTX Used to insert an interval timer in the timer list. Syntax: := TIMER^INSERTX( , , , ) where: , INT(32),

contains the address of the new timer. Returns FALSE (0d) if no unused timers were available.

, INT .EXT:ref,

contains the timer control block.

, INT (32),

is the time interval, in hundredths of a second, for the added timer.

, INT,

is the type of timer to be inserted.

, INT,

is the subtype of timer to be inserted.

example: @timer := TIMER^INSERTX( tcb, delay^time, typ, subtyp ); timer.userbuf := some^value; OR @user^area := @timer.userbuf; ! manipulate user^area structure

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Section 12 Miscellaneous Procs BINARY^SEARCH Searches a table for specified entry, returning the address within the table where a match was found. The table and the key specifier may be in extended memory. Also, the table is assumed to be in sorted ascending order. Syntax: := BINARY^SEARCH( , , , , , ) where: , INT(32),

contains the extended byte address of the matching entry, if found, else -1d.

, STRING.EXT:ref,

is the table to search.

, INT,

contains the number of entries in the table.

, INT,

contains the byte length of each entry in the table.

, STRING.EXT:ref,

is the key to search for in the table.

, INT,

is the byte offset of the key in the table entry.

, INT,

is the byte length of the key.

NOTE: Since extended pointer are always a byte address, we don't need to left-shift or right-shift our addresses.

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

12-1

Miscellaneous Procs BINARY^SEARCH example: STRING .ext tbl, .ext key; INT num^entries, entry^lgth, keyoff, keylgth; INT(32) addr; addr

:= BINARY^SEARCH( tbl, num^entries, entry^lgth, key, keyoff, keylgth );

NOTE: The BASE utility UT^BINARY^SEARCH should be used instead of BINARY^SEARCH. UT^BINARY^SEARCH is faster and more efficient.

12-2

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Miscellaneous Procs CIRC^LEFT^SHIFT

CIRC^LEFT^SHIFT Performs a circular left shift of the 64 bit value starting at a given parameter for a specified length. As the bits are shifted out at the left of the field, they are shifted into the right most bits of the field. Syntax: CALL CIRC^LEFT^SHIFT( , ) where: , INT:ref:4,

is the array to be shifted.

, INT,

is the number of bits to shift. This value is assumed to be a multiple of 4.

example: INT

.array[ 0:3 ], num^bits;

num^bits := 16; CALL CIRC^LEFT^SHIFT( array, num^bits );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

12-3

Miscellaneous Procs CIRC^RIGHT^SHIFT

CIRC^RIGHT^SHIFT Performs a circular right shift of the 64 bit value starting at "ACC". The procedure performs the shifting in multiples of 4 bits. It receives as input the number of bits to be shifted and the bit string to be shifted. The result of the operation is returned in "ACC". The shift operation is "logical" rather than "arithmetic". Syntax: CALL CIRC^RIGHT^SHIFT( , ) where: , INT:ref,

contains the bit string to shift. It is assumed to be 64 bits.

, INT,

contains the number of bits to be shifted in multiples of 4.

example: CALL CIRC^RIGHT^SHIFT( acc, num^bits );

12-4

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Miscellaneous Procs COMPLEMENT

COMPLEMENT Takes an array and complements it. Syntax: CALL COMPLEMENT( , ) where: , INT:ref,

contains the array to complement.

, INT,

contains the number of words to complement.

example: CALL COMPLEMENT( buf , cnt );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

12-5

Miscellaneous Procs CONVERT^REC^ADDR^TO^REF^NO

CONVERT^REC^ADDR^TO^REF^NO Converts the record's address to the record's reference number. The reference number of a record is its relative position in an entry sequenced file where all records are of equal ( fixed lengths ). Syntax: CALL CONVERT^REC^ADDR^TO^REF^NO( , , , , ); where: , INT(32): val

is the record's disk address.

, INT(32): ref

is the reference number of the record.

, INT: val

length of blocks in bytes.

, INT: val

length of the block header in bytes.

, INT: val

length of the record in bytes.

example: LITERAL INT(32)

blk^lgth blk^hdr^lgth rec^size ref^no, rec^addr;

= 4096, = 20, = $len( rec^def );

CALL CONVERT^REC^ADDR^TO^REF^NO( rec^addr,ref^no, blk^lgth, blk^hdr^lgth, rec^size );

12-6

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Miscellaneous Procs CONVERT^REF^NO^TO^REC^ADDR

CONVERT^REF^NO^TO^REC^ADDR Converts the reference number of a record to a record address that can be used to position into the file and read the record. The reference number of a record is its relative postion in an entry sequenced file where all records are of equal ( fixed lengths ). Syntax: CALL CONVERT^REF^NO^TO^REC^ADDR( , , , , ); where: , INT(32): val

is the reference number of the record.

, INT(32): ref

is the record's disk address.

, INT: val

length of blocks in bytes.

, INT: val

length of the block header in bytes.

, INT: val

length of the record in bytes.

example: LITERAL INT(32)

blk^lgth blk^hdr^lgth rec^size ref^no, rec^addr;

= 4096, = 20, = $len( rec^def );

CALL CONVERT^REF^NO^TO^REC^ADDR( ref^no, rec^addr, blk^lgth, blk^hdr^lgth, rec^size );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

12-7

Miscellaneous Procs CURRENT^ADDR

CURRENT^ADDR Returns the 'P' relative address of the caller, and is used mainly for logging errors detected. Syntax: := CURRENT^ADDR( , ) where: , INT,

contains the caller's 'P' register value. Should only be used by programs which "know" that they are a single code segment with no library; the p^reg alone contains insufficient data for multi-segment object files. Single segment programs could do this: wlform(convfail, "ASCII-INTEGER failed, 'P'= %@@@@@@")

, INT:ref,

contains the contents of the E register.

, INT:ref,

contains the contents of the P register.

example: If a call to ASCII^INTEGER failed, there could be one standard wlform: wlform(conv^fail, "ASCII^INTEGER failed, location\C") that can be used throughout the program, with the same message number for logger: INT

.ext e^reg, .ext p^reg;

CALL CURRENT^ADDR( e^reg, p^reg ); CALL LOGMESSAGE^( 9101, @conv^fail,,, e^reg, p^reg ); Note: Consider using the HIST_procedures as described in the Guardian Proc Calls Manual instead.

12-8

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Miscellaneous Procs DBL^OCTAL^WIDTH

DBL^OCTAL^WIDTH Returns the number of character positions necessary to print the octal representation of an INT(32) number, thus giving an alternate to zero suppression, using only those bytes needed to print a number. Syntax: := DBL^OCTAL^WIDTH( ) where: , INT,

is the number of character positions necessary to print .

, INT(32),

is the octal value to be measured by DBL^OCTAL^WIDTH.

example:

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

INT INT(32)

width; octal^val;

octal^val width

:= 7d; := DBL^OCTAL^WIDTH( octal^val );

12-9

Miscellaneous Procs DBL^WIDTH

DBL^WIDTH Returns the number of character positions necessary to print an INT(32) number, thus giving an alternative to zero suppression, using only those bytes needed to print a number. Syntax: := DBL^WIDTH( ) where: , INT,

is the number of character positions necessary to print .

, INT(32),

is the value to be measured by DBL^WIDTH.

example:

12-10

INT INT(32)

width; val;

val width

:= 226d; := DBL^WIDTH( val );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Miscellaneous Procs EDITLINENO

EDITLINENO EDITLINENO places into a string array the character version of an EDIT file sequence number sent as an argument. Since EDIT file sequence numbers are placed into INT(32) variables any similar value can of course be converted. Syntax: CALL EDITLINENO( , ) where: , STRING:ref:9,

is an array into which the converted sequence number is to be placed. Leading and trailing zeroes are suppressed. The decimal point is always in position [ 5 ], whether the value returned is zero, less than one or a whole number.

, INT(32):val,

is the value that is to be converted. Edit file sequence numbers are in the form "n.nnn", so the number is divided by 1000 to obtain the whole number and the remainder is the fraction.

example: STRING INT(32)

.out^string[ 0:8 ]; seq^num;

seq^num := 12345d; CALL EDITLINENO( out^string, seq^num );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

12-11

Miscellaneous Procs FUNCTION^KEY

FUNCTION^KEY Returns a value from -16 to +16 for the values of the function keys or an error value. Value 0 indicates that break was pressed. If an error occurs, it is added to 1000 before returning. This prevents errors between 1 and 16 being confused with valid function keys. The parameter error contains the actual error number. Negative numbers are returned for shifted function keys. Syntax: := FUNCTION^KEY( , ) where: , INT,

contains the number of the function key. Negative numbers are returned for shifted keys. If an error occurs, the error number is added to 1000 before returning.

, INT,

contains the file number of the file to be read.

, INT:ref,

contains a value for any error. Contains 0 if no error occurs.

example: INT

function^key^num, file^num, err;

function^key^num

12-12

:= FUNCTION^KEY( file^num, error );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Miscellaneous Procs GET^NEXT^ARG

GET^NEXT^ARG Makes it possible to obtain the next of a series of elements from an array, with any specified field separator. Syntax: := GET^NEXT^ARG( , , , ) where: , INT,

contains the address of the next element in the list if there is one, or FALSE if there is not.

, STRING:ref,

is the pointer to an array containing the (remaining) elements in the list. This array must be delimited by a null byte at the end. The PROC will count anything contained in parentheses, single or double quotes, as a single element.

, STRING:ref,

is the array into which the next element is to be placed. This array remains unchanged if no elements remain.

, INT:ref,

on entry, contains the maximum number of bytes to be fetched -- normally, the length of . On return to the calling program, contains the length of the element fetched or -1 if no element was fetched.

, STRING:value,

is the character used as field separator in the array pointed at by . If omitted, a comma is used as the default delimiter.

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

12-13

Miscellaneous Procs GET^NEXT^ARG examples: STRING INT

.str^array[ 0:10 ], .output^array[ 0:3 ]; .addr, lgth, delimiter;

str^array[ 10 ] lgth delimiter str^array @addr

12-14

':='[ 0 ]; := 11; := "#"; ':=' "hi # bye #"; := GET^NEXT^ARG( str^array, output^array, lgth, delimiter );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Miscellaneous Procs MOTHER

MOTHER Provides the process name or identification number of its creator and/or the creator's program file name. Syntax: CALL MOTHER( , ) where: , INT:ref:4,

if present, is an array where this process returns the process ID or the process name of the caller's creator. If exists it will be in the format: [ 0:2 ] = $ [ 3 ]., = , INT:ref:12, [ 0:3 ] [ 4:7 ] [ 8:11 ]

if present, contains the program file name of the caller's creator in format: = $ = =

example: INT

.mom^name[ 0:11 ], .mom^prog[ 0:11 ];

CALL MOTHER( mom^name, mom^prog ); Note: Not Highpin enabled.

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

12-15

Miscellaneous Procs MSG^AGE

MSG^AGE Returns the number of seconds that a message has been in our queue until we read it. Syntax: := MSG^AGE( ) where: , INT(32),

contains the number of seconds elapsed between the time net delivered a message to us, and the time we actually read it from our queue.

, INT:ref,

contains the 3 word timestamp from the message header.

example: INT(32) INT

lgth; .msg^time;

IF MSG^AGE( msg^time ) > 'an INT(32) value' THEN ...

12-16

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Miscellaneous Procs OCTAL^WIDTH

OCTAL^WIDTH Returns the number of character positions necessary to print the octal representation of an octal number, thus giving an alternative to zero suppression, using only the bytes needed to print a number. Syntax: := OCTAL^WIDTH( ) where: , INT,

is the number of character positions necessary to print .

, INT,

is the octal value to be measured by OCTAL^WIDTH.

example:

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

INT

width, octal^val;

octal^val width

:= 226; := OCTAL^WIDTH( octal^val );

12-17

Miscellaneous Procs RANDOM

RANDOM Accepts a double word "seed" and returns a double word random number. When the seed for this call is the random number from the last call, the number generated does not fall into a repeating pattern for several million calls. Syntax: CALL RANDOM( , ) where: , INT(32):ref,

contains the generated "random" number upon return from the PROC.

, INT(32):ref,

is the "seed" used to generate the "random" number.

example: INT(32)

random^num, seed;

seed := 2389d; CALL RANDOM( random^num, seed );

12-18

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Miscellaneous Procs SHA1^HASH

SHA1^HASH This procedure generates a 20-byte hash value from an input string using the SHA-1 (Secure Hash Algorithm 1) function. Syntax: := SHA1^HASH ( , , )

where: , INT,

returns TRUE (non-zero) if an error occurred.

, STRING:ref

data to be hashed.

, INT

the byte length of .

, STRING:ref

the 20-byte hash value.

example: stat := SHA1^HASH ( input^data, input^lgth, sha1^hash );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

12-19

Miscellaneous Procs TRACK^LEN

TRACK^LEN Calculates the length of a passed ABA formatted track. Syntax: := TRACK^LEN( , ) where: , INT,

will return the number of bytes found for the track length.

, STRING:ref,

contains the track 2 or track 3 format.

, INT,

contains the length of the input string.

example:

12-20

STRING INT

.trk[ 0:9 ]; max^lgth, lgth;

trk lgth

':=' ";1234567890123=9912 "; := TRACK^LEN( trk, max^lgth );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

Miscellaneous Procs UT^FNAMECOLLAPSE

UT^FNAMECOLLAPSE Works exactly like Guardian's FNAMECOLLAPSE except that if there is not an expand system name on the returned external^name then it tries to put one there, even if the volume name is 8 characters long. This means the length of the external file name has to be 35 characters long instead of 34. Syntax: := UT^FNAMECOLLAPSE( internal^name , external^name ) where: , INT,

contains the number of bytes in the external name.

, INT:ref,

contains the name to be converted.

, STRING:ref,

contains the external form of the internal name after the procedure.

example: retn^val := UT^FNAMECOLLAPSE( internal^name, external^name );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

12-21

Miscellaneous Procs WIDTH

WIDTH Returns the number of character positions necessary to print a given integer value, thus giving an alternative to zero suppression, using only the bytes needed to print a number. Syntax: := WIDTH( ) where: , INT,

is the number of character positions necessary to print .

, INT,

is the value to be measured by WIDTH.

example:

12-22

INT

width, val;

val width

:= 1000; := WIDTH( val );

Nov-2006 ACI Worldwide Inc.

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